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Indipendent Publishing

Zander
I have several friends who are indi publishing their work. I am trying to comprise a list of their sites to help boost the signal.



http://www.starcatcherpub.com/

http://jjwestendarp.blogspot.com/


This is a list I will be updating regularly.

And here is a freebe

Return to Redlin. This is the bit from the site:

Ginger returned to Redlin after her failed marriage and buried herself in a calm life, working for the Senior Center during the day and as a clerk at the Gas and More at night. But when the high school bad boy, Derrick Weston, returns after ten years to attend his grandfather's funeral, things take off in ways she didn't expect.

Old rivalries and new robberies put the two in close contact -- whether they want it or not.


I read this story and couldn't stop till the end, which was satisfactory (everything was wrapped up very nicely, good solid plot) and saddened me. I wanted more of these characters. The characters are well written, I have this urge to ask Zette what happened next. :P Anyways, if you want a lighthearted romance which will leave you smiling I highly recommend this novella.

Elemental Truth Cover

Zander

Originally published at Necia Phoenix. You can comment here or there.

So a dear friend, J.A. Marlow, does some really awesomesauce covers. Since my life has recently exploded in my face, she was kind enough to whip up a cover for Elemental Truth.

Elemental Truth Cover

**squees**

**cough**

SO, fellow writers, if you need a cover, her rates and other examples of her artwork are over here. I highly recommend her.

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Elemental Truth ~ Chapter 11

Zander

Originally published at Necia Phoenix. You can comment here or there.

Disclaimer;  Elemental Truth, the first of the Elemental Wars books, is in the final stages of editing.  Hope you all enjoy it.

 

 Chapter 11

“She said you’re on a mission for the Seeress.” Vieno said, her voice low. Tier glanced towards her then back to his bags.

“I am.” He closed his travel bag, meeting her eyes. “There wasn’t an option to turn her down.”

“Why you?” Vieno clasped her hands together, shaking her head. “No, what goes on in the mind of the Seeress is known only to her. What has she sent you for?”

“Vieno,”

“Tier.”

Tier glanced around the room. It looked secure, but Chiron’s home was riddled with old passages and hidden niches. There could be any number of listeners. He held out his hands, Vieno nodded, moving over to the wall, pressing her palm against the stucco.

“There are old secrets, some that should never be overheard.” Vieno met his eyes. Light flared up under her palm, streaking out on either side, bathing the room in a soft red glow. She looked up at him, her lip twitching.

“How did you do that?” He asked. She shook her head.

“It would take too long to explain. What has the Seeress asked you to do?”

“She ordered me to locate elementals.”

“What?”

“And bring them back to her to help mend the world.” Tier ran a hand through his hair.

“Mend the world?”

“That’s what she said.” Tier felt his stomach twist. Now, miles away from the seeress it felt a very thin explanation. Vieno paced slowly not meeting his eyes.

“She wiped out the elementals, generations ago.” She said. “There’s another reason she wants you to bring them to her. It’s impossible, there are no more.”

“That’s what I thought.” Tier said slowly. Vieno halted and looked at him. Her eyes widened as it struck her. She nodded.

“I see.” Vieno pressed her fingers together in front of her.

“I can’t figure out what I’m missing.” He admitted.

“She sent you to Dhaul?” Vieno scowled.

“Aye. But gave us no indication as to where we needed to go next. We figured that the earth shapers were originally from this area, so we came here. Not sure where to go from here though.”

“It’s futile, Tier. There have not been reports of Earth Shapers since I was a child. And as far as I know there are no more air weavers.” Vieno’s eyes narrowed. “The fire wielders were all in the Sandau and plains region, as far as I know there are none.”

“There were rumors in Jacktor that the Lord of Sandau is a fire lord.”

Vieno waved her hand, shaking her head. “No, we would have heard such news here. There’s something she didn’t tell you.”

“I worry that this isn’t,” he hesitated. “The honorable path.”

“You question her?” Vieno asked softly.

Tier swallowed. “Not exactly.”

“One can be loyal to Nekar, but not to her, you know.” She said it softly. Tier stared at her, the words echoing in his head.

“She is Nekar.” He murmured.

“I don’t believe that. And neither do you.”

“Just saying that can get me killed, Vieno.”

“Serving her, will get you killed.” She touched his hand.

“Perhaps. I doubt that she’d call on the Imperial household just to kill me off though.” Tier pointed out.

Vieno inclined her head. “This is true.” She pressed her hand against the wall again and the color faded. “Sleep well, dear one.”

She was gone before he could say goodnight.

 

Vieno hurried through the old city, stepping gingerly over sprawled drunks and piles of rubbish, her mind whirring. She barely glanced at the archway she ducked beneath, though she paused, looking around once before sliding behind the ragged cloth that hung over the doorway. Two men inside stood, startled and hastily bowed.

“Lady Vieno, we weren’t expecting,”

“Do you have a runner available?” She asked. She didn’t have much time, her absence couldn’t be noticed.

“Yes my lady, but,”

“I need you to send this to Lorn.” She held out a small black feather. Both men frowned.

“A feather?”

“The recipient will know its meaning.” She pierced the men with a cold look. “Can your runner leave now?”

“Of course I can!” A slender man stepped into the room from the hall, bowing deeply. He took the feather from her staring at it with narrow eyes before looking at her. “It cracks?”

“Slightly. You have a name?”

“Anil, my lady. At your service.” He bowed again. Vieno smiled. Yes, this one would do nicely. “This must be delivered to,” He held out his hand.

“Ambassador Xeresel.” Vieno clasped her hands in front of her. “It is vital you get this to him, as quickly as possible.”

He tucked the feather into a bag which he hung on his belt.

“When you return, report to me directly at the palace.”

“Yes my lady.” He gave his fellows a salute, bowed again to Vieno, and ducked out the door.

Vieno nodded, glancing at the two startled men. “You didn’t see me.” “Of course not, my lady.” They sat, backs to the doorway.

She slipped from the room, glancing around. Anil was nowhere to be seen. She took a deep breath and began to make her way back to the palace.

 

~*~

The next chapter will be posted Tues, July 31st.

If you’re enjoying it, please share, spread the word, I’d appreciate it.

Want more to read? Check out J.A. Marlow’s Summer Crash serial!

Thanks for reading. :)

(c) 2014 Necia Phoenix

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Elemental Truth Chapter 10

Zander

Originally published at Necia Phoenix. You can comment here or there.

This entry is part 11 of 11 in the series Elemental Truth

Disclaimer;  Elemental Truth, the first of the Elemental Wars books, is in the final stages of editing.  Hope you all enjoy it.

 

Chapter 10

“I behaved poorly, your highness, I beg your forgiveness.” Lord Chiron said.

“You were drunk.” Tier shrugged, not looking up from the stack of maps he was going through. He had little patience for the man. “It happens.”

“I trust your traveling companion is not too upset?”

Tier lifted an old, worn parchment. “If your wife hadn’t dropped her food on you, Xin would’ve.” He glanced up at Chiron, smiling. “You deserved it cousin.”

“Indeed.” Chiron gritted out. Tier ignored his glare, shuffling through the collection of maps and scrolls. “I’m not entirely sure I understand what you are looking for. You’ve never been an academic type.”

Tier leaned back, drumming his fingers on the table. “The Seeress,” He hesitated. Chiron didn’t need the details. “Asked me to look into something for her, however she was vague on some of the details. Sandau was our next planned stop, but if your military advisers were correct,”

“They are.” Chiron snapped. “The Emperor is aware of the situation and told us to take the fort anyways!”

“Then Sandau is out of the question.” Tier ignored Chiron’s grumbling. “I saw a map in the south, showing cities I’ve never seen before.”

“There were northern territories, once we traded with them, if history is to be believed. There has not been trade or any kind of communication with those territories in generations.” Chiron pulled a map from the stack of parchments Tier hadn’t gotten to. “Look,” he set the map in front of Tier. “Some say they were elemental run cities. Others say they were fortresses of the great dragons. I think they’re naught but ruin.”

Tier peered at the map, beyond the canyons to the north, several large marks, the names faded and worn.

“Absolutely infuriating. What we need is a good assassin to take out that damned Corrin and the others that are keeping our forces from taking the fort.” Chiron was pacing.

“I don’t know that a commander from a backwater country like Sandau would be, in father’s eyes, worth sending an assassin.” Tier pointed out.

“That’s what you said yesterday.” Chiron paused by the window looking out. “I hardly think Sandau a backwater country, and I think that the Emperor should rethink our position. It is a dangerous nation, waiting for a moment of weakness. Delebeg is not the strongest territory of the Empire. If Sandau decided to move in our direction,” he held out his hands.

“Then the might of the Empire would be brought down on their asses.” Tier shrugged it off. He’d sat in Chiron’s war meeting, his suggestions, based off of his own experiences were ignored.

“On three separate occasions I was ordered to take the damn fort. Each time Corrin managed a minor miracle and we find ourselves slinking back, tail tucked between our legs.” Chiron sipped at a glass of the purple wine he favored. “I received several letters, from the Emperor and one from the Seeress herself, telling me to take the damned fort.” He glared at Tier. “Each time that bitch out-thinks Delebeg’s finest.”

Tier bit the inside of his lip, restraining himself. He wanted to get out of Delebeg, out of the heat and the acid atmosphere, away from his damnable cousin.

“I gave my advice, yesterday. It’s not my problem.” He tapped the map, tired of talk of the fort. We’ll go through the canyons and make for one of those old cities.” He murmured, gut twisting. “What city is this?”

“The locals called it Hyrfett.” Chiron went back to the arched window, staring down at the gardens through the white lattice work. “Once Delebeg was the capital of the Earth Elementals. Air Weavers, or floaters, had a city suspended above the canyon.”

“I’ve never heard of it.” Tier regarded Chiron in surprise. He’d never thought that Chiron would have been well versed in any kind of folklore.

“Neither had I till we chased a band of ruffians into the canyons in the early days of my being sentenced here. We found a village at the base of a massive rubble pile. The villagers said the last stand of the Air Weavers was made there. Said the Nekarian army took out the rock supports with false fire in the middle of the night and collapsed the whole damn thing.” He sipped from his wineglass and shook his head. “I think taking a look at that rubble is worth it.”

“I’m not really one for architecture.” Tier stood and joined Chiron by the window, glancing down at the private gardens below. He tensed, following Chiron’s gaze. Xin sat beside one of the fountains, elbow on the marble staring at the water looking bored. She was surrounded by the other ladies of the household, with Vieno hovering nearby. She wore a dress similar to the one at dinner, though this was a pale blue. Her hair hung loose, the light shining off it gave a hint of blue. She straightened and stood, responding to something Vieno said.

“She is exquisite, cousin. I dare say she held the dining hall captivated last night.” Chiron’s voice was admiring. Tier forced a smile, unable to tear his eyes from her as she edged away from the other women. “Dhaulain I am guessing?”

“Yes.” Tier went to the liquor board, pouring a small glass of brandy. He didn’t drink often, too easy to drink too much, but he had to do something. He rejoined Chiron at the window.

“Whose bed does she grace?” Chiron asked archly. “Yours? Or Rale’s?”

“Neither.” Tier gritted his teeth, setting the brandy down on the windowsill untouched. “Why do you ask, you’re married.”

“That hasn’t stopped me before.” Chiron sipped again from his wineglass. “She should be taught the respect of her betters, you know.”

Tier took a deep breath fighting the urge to shove Chiron’s wineglass down his throat, or up his ass. “The only one to be teaching her that lesson would be me.” He forced his voice to be cold, as an Imperial should be.

Chiron looked at him startled, a mocking smile flickered at his lips. “Can I consider this a claim, cousin?”

“Consider it whatever you want to, Lord Chiron. I will not restrain myself from taking off your hand if you touch her.” Tier stepped forward, shamelessly using his heavier frame to crowd Chiron, forcing the other man to step back.

Chiron’s eyes widened, jaw clenched. “Fancy you finding interest in a slip of a peasant slut.” he spat the last and Tier struggled with a sudden surge of rage. He forced himself to take a deep breath.

“You have presumed much, in this short time, and have tried my patience.” Tier gritted out. “Even in the Imperial War College in Lorn, the complaints of the women of your household have been heard. We’re guests, passing through on a mission that is none of your business. If you want to pursue something, pursue reconciliation with your wife. It might make your bedroom life better. You go near Xin, I won’t stop myself. Got it?”

Blood drained from Chiron’s face and he swallowed several times. “Yes, your highness.” he finally croaked out.

Tier studied him before turning back to the table and its stack of letters and things. “We’ll dine in my quarters this eve, to save you the hassle.” Tier locked eyes on his cousin. “Is that acceptable?”

“Of course, your Highness.” Chiron spoke through gritted teeth. “Whatever you desire.”

Tier tucked the map into his vest and left. He needed to move, get some fresh, non-dry air. And to get space between him and that sniveling worm.

 

The women of Chiron’s household had long decided she was not interesting. Their talk, consisting of court and household gossip and clothing styles, bored Xin to the core. She considered flicking some water at them, but there were too many eyes and she couldn’t risk exposure. Instead she half listened to their talk, watching the ripples in the water and the small flying insects that came to drink. She looked up when they fell silent and smiled. Tier barely acknowledged them, nodding at Vieno.

“We need to talk.” He motioned the walking path that wound through the garden. Xin was relieved to see him. He was a rock in a sea of uncertainty.

“Problems?” She peered up at him.

“Not exactly.”

She nodded tensing slightly when he rested his hand on her lower back guiding her past whispering women and down the tree lined walkway. The heat from his palm, his arm brushing her side and shoulder made her heart pound. It annoyed her to have such reactions to him. Rale didn’t send her heart pounding, nor did he grace her dreams at night. Tier was an imperial prince, for all she knew he was married or betrothed to some fine noblewoman. She had to keep that in mind. But it was hard to remember when the slightest touch sent her thoughts into a tailspin.

“Something wrong?” She asked, glancing up at him. She could see the tension in his face, feel it through his touch. Once they got a distance from the fountain he stepped away, pacing in the small clearing. Fear filled her. “Did my outburst cause you trouble?”

“No.” He said quickly, staring at her. “Not at all.” His dark eyes intense, several times he looked as if her were about to speak before he sighed rubbing the bridge of his nose. Xin bit her cheek to keep from smiling, he looked almost flustered. “We’ll be leaving in the morning. I gave Chiron orders to allow our to dine in my quarters. Less formal, fewer eyes.”

“Fewer food fights?” Xin asked, snickering. He chuckled. “Will we be heading to Sandau then?”

“We’ll discuss it at dinner.” He sank onto the bench. “There are to many mice here.”

Xin blinked and nodded, of course, spies. “Things aren’t what they seem here, are they?”

“Nothing is. No matter where you go.” He shrugged. “I want to get back to south.”

Xin swallowed. “Homesick?”

A shudder ran through him and he shook his head. “Not exactly. I left mid siege and have been on the road. I have no idea how that’s going, no word from the south has reached Chiron either.”

“Duty. Of course.” She looked away. “The women here were talking about the trouble Chiron’s in.”

“He wanted no assistance, nor did his people want to hear my suggestions.” There was a touch of annoyance, injured pride perhaps?

“Tough to get a no, eh?” She asked without thinking. His eyebrows shot up but he gave a rueful grin.

“Not used to hearing it.”

“Of course not. Who says no to the Imperial prince?” Xin stepped back when he stood, though he just seemed amused.

“I really hate my titles.”

“You wear them very well though, Tier. Even if you pretend you don’t.”

“I will have to remember not to try to mince words with you, woman. You have a mean tongue.” He said. “Come on. There is enough gossip in this pit of vipers, I’d rather not add to it.”

“Great.”

“The women giving you trouble?” Tier asked. Xin shrugged.

“No. I’m not highborn enough for them. Not to mention all they talk about is clothes and who is sleeping with whom.” she fluttered her hand. “I got my fill of that from Matau.”

“Which is why I tend to avoid court.” He pointed towards the complex of buildings. “There’s a library to hide in over this way, if you want to get away.”

“A library? You read for leisure?” She asked archly. He shook his head.

“On occasion.” he laughed. “More often I’ll sleep. It’s very peaceful, even the most tiresome old windbags shut up in the library.”

~*~

The next chapter will be posted Tues, July 29th.

If you’re enjoying it, please share, spread the word, I’d appreciate it.

Want more to read? Check out J.A. Marlow’s Summer Crash serial!

Thanks for reading. :)

(c) 2014 Necia Phoenix

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Elemental Truth Chapter 9 pt 2

Zander

Originally published at Necia Phoenix. You can comment here or there.

Disclaimer;  Elemental Truth, the first of the Elemental Wars books, is in the final stages of editing.  Hope you all enjoy it.

 

 

With Vieno’s warnings in mind, and her head feeling like her scalp was going to rip off, Xin followed the matronly woman to the waiting chamber. Though she’d felt almost dazzled by the dress Vieno had draped on her, the other women’s gowns, edged in gold and silver, made hers look far simpler. Vieno smiled at her, turned and left. The other women eyed her, like a cat would eye a mouse.

They were all taller than she was, darker complicated and heavily adorned with beads and things in their hair and dangling from their earlobes. They took her in, whispering amongst themselves and then dismissed her as a loud gong echoed. There were several low tables, men sitting on cushions on the marble floor and a crescent shaped table up on a dais. Lord Chiron sat at the center, to his left was a space that, as she hesitated, was filled by one of the elegant women. To his right sat Tier and Rale, a space between them. When they saw her they exchanged a look she couldn’t read before Tier motioned her to join them. To the space beside him. In front of all those people who watched her every move.

She made her way quickly, praying she wouldn’t trip on the skirts or the cushions that were lining either side of the tables. When she reached the dais she was shaking and she sank to the cushion between the men, locking her eyes on the plate before her.

“You all right?” Tier asked in a low voice. She glanced up at him trying not to see the people watching her. Both he and Rale had changed into more appropriate dinner wear, tunic and robes similar in style to the Delebeg people. It was odd seeing Tier without armor or weapons. Clothing change or not, he looked like a soldier in finery, which was oddly comforting.

“There are a lot of people here.” She whispered. Tier nodded and rested his hand on her knee, leaning over towards her.

“Pretend they aren’t there. You’ll be fine.” His voice was the barest whisper.

“Easy for you to say.” She glanced up at him when he squeezed her knee in a manner she guessed meant to be reassuring.

“They’re too worried with my title to see the people around them.” he squeezed her knee again and then removed his hand. Xin bit her lip looking back down at her plate feeling slightly bereft. She rubbed her forehead, what was she thinking?

“Just ignore them.” Rale murmured at her other side. “They’re too worried about impressing Tier at the moment.”

“I know, but it’s kind of hard to ignore them.” Xin did a quick glance around the room her stomach did a flop. Chiron watched her, his expression cold, emotionless. His eyes revealed nothing, Xin fought the urge to shiver and run, instead forcing a courteous smile.

“Is everything acceptable?” he hesitated. “My lady?” He said the last slowly, as if in doubt his gaze flickering past her. An attempted insult, she was certain of it. His expression gave nothing away but she could feel the tension in both Tier and Rale.

“Yes, my lord.” She forced her own smile, blinking several times vapidly. He wanted to play games? She’d played games with Matau aplenty. “It is unexpected to find such revelry so far from the Empire.” She smiled again, this time pleased to see the tension in his shoulders.

“Delebeg is the Empire, my lady.” he replied through gritted teeth.

“On the outskirts of, I suppose.” she said sweetly. Tier’s hand was back on her knee, gentle warning pressure. “It is a beautiful dining hall.” she hesitated before adding “My Lord.” Tier’s fingers dug into her knee almost painfully. Rale jabbed her in the side.

“Be nice.” Rale hissed at her.

Lord Chiron smiled coldly at her then looked towards the back of the room, clapping twice, loudly. Servants filed in, scantily clad men and women with trays of all sorts of food. Meats, roasts, fruits, jugs of liquids with fine goblets adorned huge silver trays, and with them wafted the rich smells that made her mouth water.

Though she felt a bit braver for crossing subtle insults with Chiron, as the noise in the room grew Xin longed for the little cove in Dhaul, for her small attic. Even the fortress chambers, anything but this hall with all its noise and so many people. Everyone from her village could have fit in this room. Rale handed her a small glass of water.

“Whatever you do don’t drink the wine.” he whispered.

“Why?” Xin glanced up and down the table, neither Rale nor Tier had any of it though Chiron’s clear glass was full of the pale purple liquid.

“The wine’s strong and I don’t trust Chiron.” Rale tapped the plate with his knife. “That red stuff is spicy, it burns. The meat should be pretty good, but anything that is red, steer clear of.”

Xin looked at him and nodded. “Anything else I should know?” she whispered.

“Chiron hates Tier. I think the feeling might be mutual.” Rale ate a bit, motioning her to do the same. Tier and Chiron were talking about some military issue. “Chiron will try to goad you or I into being rude. If we slip he can complain to the Emperor, which might give Tier some trouble.”

Xin nodded. She stared at the food her stomach doing flops. “There’s too many people here.”

“This is nothing.” Rale touched her hand. “The hall of the Imperial Palace is twice this size, so is the hall in Lorn. This,” he gestured to the hall. “Is small.”

Chiron slammed his hand down, startling everyone. Tier looked at him.

“A bit extreme, don’t you think?” Tier’s voice was bland.

“Whose hall is this, your highness?”

“T’was merely a suggestion, at the insistence of your general, Chiron. Nothing more. Nothing personal.” Tier sipped his water and made a motion with his free hand. “You’ve brought back some old traditions, I’ve only read about. Why?”

Chiron lifted his wine glass and sneered. “There are certain things we’ve let go of since the campaigns to expand began. Did you know,” he paused downing his wine. Xin glanced at Rale who was slowly shaking his head. “That in the days of our Great Grandfather women wouldn’t dine in the same room as the leaders?”

“Indeed.” Tier’s hand rested again on Xin’s knee. She considered batting it off, but restrained herself.

“Women are unclean, they say.” Chiron looked directly at Xin. “In the days of our glorious ancestors women wouldn’t even live in the same house as the men.”

“I’m sure the Seeress would find that truly enlightening, seeing as she is, after all, a woman.” Xin said sweetly, batting at Tier’s hand. The mention of the Seeress had an instant effect on both men. The blood drained from Chiron’s face, even Tier glared at her.

“The Seeress changed those traditions, and for reason.” Tier said. Xin batted at his hand again glaring. The gong sounded again.

“That’s the cue for the unclean women to leave.” A woman’s voice broke the strained silence. Chiron’s woman stood, tipping the plate of food in her hand over Chiron’s head, and let the platter fall to the ground with a loud, echoing clatter. “Perhaps you should ask the Seeress for clarification on this, tradition.” She snarled. She stormed down from the dais as Chiron spluttered. Tier released Xin’s knee, but gripped her arm as she prepared to stand.

“Go straight to the rooms they assigned you. We’ll talk once this mess is cleared up.” The cold tone in his voice sent chills up her spine. She nodded and he released her. “And keep quiet. Please?”

She took a deep breath. “Only because you said please.” She murmured. As she stood she caught the hint of amusement in Tier’s eyes and Rale had both hands covering his face, his shoulders shaking. As she left she felt almost lighthearted. Almost. She felt the weight of Chiron’s dark glare at her back as she left, and she wished Tier could have gone with her.

 

“You’re lucky we’re guests.” Tier said as he entered.

Xin half turned in the chair, heart pounding. How did the man, large as he was move so quietly? Vieno chuckled behind her.

“She’s got fire. I don’t think there was a person in there who disagreed with her. Many of the nobles, men and women alike are getting tired of Chiron’s ways.” Vieno said. The woman was removing the string of pearls and undoing the twisting braids in Xin’s hair.

“Chiron’s fuming. Serves the bastard right.” Tier set a tray down on the low table and made his way over. Xin looked back at the mirror watching his reflection. He grinned. “I think Rale cracked a rib laughing.”

“Chiron’s woman has created many public scandals.” Vieno set the pearls to one side, smiling at Xin in the mirror. “She embarrasses him constantly.”

“He’s an embarrassment to the Empire. That’s why he’s in Delebeg.”

Vieno paused. “True. Delebeg suffers for it though.”

Xin looked down in her lap, at her hands. “I’m sorry he was, aggravating me.”

“No need to apologize.” Tier said with a chuckle.

Xin glanced up at the mirror as he sat in one of the low chairs.

“Bastard deserved it.” He said.

“Tier.” Vieno admonished.

“Vieno, he was goading her, if she hadn’t snapped Rale would have or I. She can get away with it, we can’t.”

“Still.” Vieno finished and ran a comb through Xin’s hair. “He’s still your blood.”

“Vieno,”

“He and Maen are alike. And they know how to get under your skin.”

“Maen was never this aggravating.” Tier snorted.

“I’m sure he would find that interesting.” Vieno stepped back. “You finish your meal, I’ll see you in the morning.”

“Thank you Vieno.” Xin said quickly running her hands through her hair. Her head still felt tight and achy from having her hair twisted so tightly.

“Won’t you stay?” Tier asked smoothly. “There’s enough for all, including Rale if he decides to stop ogling Fatira.”

“No, I ate already.” She gave him a slight bow. “Goodnight children.”

“Children?” Tier asked archly.

“When I look at you, Tier, I still see the twelve year old boy trying to wield a battle axe larger than he was!” Vieno patted his shoulder as she passed by.

“That ended badly.” He snorted again. “And that boy grew up a long time ago.”

“You’re still alone though.” Vieno gave him a long look before curtsying and leaving.

“She cares a lot for you.” Xin observed. Tier looked at her nodding.

“She’s an amazing woman.” Tier motioned her over. “You can’t eat halfway across the room, Xin.”

Xin stood, made her way to the low chair across from where Tier sat and seated herself looking at Tier for a moment her stomach doing wild flops.

“I’m sorry Tier.”

He leaned forward shaking his head as he pulled the cover off the tray. “And I said not to apologize.”

“But,”

“Chiron is drunk.” He lifted a plate and handed it to her. “He started drinking around the same time we arrived and, according to his servants, hasn’t stopped.”

Xin took the plate and sat back, crossing her legs under her. “Because of you being here?”

“More than likely. Chiron and I don’t care for each other.” He leaned back with a chuckle. “Like my brother, Chiron seeks recognition for deeds others have done.”

“And you don’t?” Xin asked after quickly swallowing a piece of meat.

“I have my reputation.” He shrugged. “It is enough to know my advice and experience is sought after, even if I am, officially, on vacation.”

They ate in comfortable silence, far more peaceful than the dining hall, though Tier did comment several times about Rale’s absence. Long after Tier left, Xin sat staring at the seat he’d occupied.

~*~

The next chapter will be posted Thurs, July 24th.

If you’re enjoying it, please share, spread the word, I’d appreciate it.

Want more to read? Check out J.A. Marlow’s Summer Crash serial!

Thanks for reading. :)

(c) 2014 Necia Phoenix

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Elemental Truth Chapter 9 pt 1

Zander

Originally published at Necia Phoenix. You can comment here or there.

This entry is part 9 of 9 in the series Elemental Truth

Disclaimer;  Elemental Truth, the first of the Elemental Wars books, is in the final stages of editing.  Hope you all enjoy it.

 

Chapter 9 pt 1

The city of Delebeg dominated the desert valley, the towering walls of the city a ruddy red matching the local rock. It straddled a dry riverbed that was dotted with old, long unused docks. The road leading to the tall gates was wide and lined with tall stones. The guards at the gate straightened and nodded in Tier’s direction as they passed through.

Within the walls, the buildings were the same mud brick as the walls, and the dry dusty air made Xin feel like she was about to sneeze. Xin trailed behind the men. People stopped, staring as they went by. Many of them were dressed in loose robes that billowed in the lightest breeze.

In the center of the city, glowing white beneath the unforgiving sun, was a palace. The closer they got to it, the more Xin noticed greenery. She frowned, glancing back. The people were following them from a distance. Xin swallowed, and urged her horse to move faster, closer to Rale and Tier. These people were unnerving.

The road changed as they neared the palace. From brick to carefully laid cobblestones, and those following them stopped at the line where it changed. Neither men seemed to notice. Xin forced her attention on the arched gate. Beyond the gate was a courtyard and on the far end was a set of steps leading up to double doors. At the top of the steps stood a man. Tall, thin and gaunt, his eyes glittered as they neared. Tier raised his hand in greeting and dismounted.

“No fanfare, no announcements nor chalets, just riding up the road. Gods of the great high one, you haven’t changed a bit.” The man’s voice was deep and though he was smiling, it failed to reach his eyes. Xin’s stomach twisted. There was something off about this man, but she wasn’t sure what.

“Hello Lord Chiron, I don’t suppose we could impose on your hospitality?” Tier asked, meeting him half way down the steps. “We’ve been on the old road for a while, and could use a rest.”

“My household would be honored to have you here, your highness.” Chiron said, bowing. “Lord Rale? Is that you under all that dust?”

“It is.” Rale slid off his horse and limped over to Xin’s horse. “It’s a hell of a trek down the mountain.”

“It is.” Chiron laughed. “Why did you take the old road.”

“Scenery!”

Xin dismounted stepping back as several youths with shaved heads arrived, bowed to them and took the reins from their hands, guiding the horses towards a side archway. Xin watched bemused. She couldn’t tell if they were male or female and their simple clothes didn’t give any hints When she looked back towards the men, Lord Chiron was staring at her, his heavy brows pulled together. His false smile faded.

“I do not recognize you, my lady.” Chiron’s voice was odd. Xin glanced over at Tier, unsure of what to say.

“This is Xin.” Tier motioned her over, resting a hand on her shoulder, he squeezed gently. “A road companion headed for Sandau.”

Xin gave what she hoped was a proper curtsy. The way Chiron was staring at her made her wonder if she’d sprouted horns and hadn’t noticed.

“Still picking up strays along the way, eh?” Chiron looked back at Tier and sneered. He motioned them to follow him up the stairs. “You haven’t changed at all.”

“I believe you said that already.” Rale muttered as he touched Xin’s shoulder. “Come on, this will be unpleasant. Chiron hogs the water for the palace grounds so we might as well take advantage of it.”

“Is that why the people were following us?”

“Chiron isn’t exactly liked. The people here are always short on water.” Rale glanced behind him. “That’s how Chiron keeps them docile.”

“Awful.”

“It is. He is.”

“It is going to be a long few days.” Xin murmured.

“Yep.” Rale grimaced and allowed her to go ahead of him into the palace.

They followed Chiron through large open halls and corridors, a maze that Xin feared she’d get lost in if left behind. The forest and finding her way in the mountains were easy. The mere idea of trying to manage these passages by herself made her gut twist. They were nearing another set of doors when Xin felt the heavy pull of water.

She hesitated, glancing around. When the doors opened from without, the moisture hit her. Chiron had led them to an inner courtyard that flaunted his ownership of the water. It was dominated by a large fountain and pool, and around the base was a pond with water lilies. Along the edge of the courtyard, in huge buckets, were fruit laden trees. The moisture tugged at her, calling to her. She wanted to dive into the fountain, to rid herself of the dust and dry air.

She hesitated at the entry, glancing at Tier. He was listening to whatever Chiron was saying.

“We have a situation to the northeast. I must meet with my officials.” Chiron was saying.

He clapped twice and two young women with dark skin and draped in loose, light yellow wraps, hurried over. Behind them, her steps slow and deliberate, her hands clasped in front of her, was an older woman. Her skin not quite as dark, and her wraps though similar style, were a rich orange with embroidery along the edges. One of the robes was pulled halfway over her head, covering her hair from view. She halted and bowed at Chiron.

“You called, my lord?”

“Take care of my guests.” HE turned towards Tier. “Is there anything else, your highness?”

“No. Thank you. We will see you at dinner then.” Tier said, his tone had a touch of steel that Xin hadn’t heard before. She glanced at Rale whose eyebrows arched in surprise though he said nothing.

Lord Chiron spun around and hurried off, his robes swishing as he went. Xin breathed a sigh of relief. The man had an oily aura about him that she didn’t care for. She turned her attention to the women.

The two younger women half knelt, heads lowered. The older woman smiled at them, holding out her hands. Tier bowed, much to Xin’s surprise, and stepped forward, catching the woman in a tight embrace.

“You have been away for far too long, Tier.” she spoke slowly, her accent heavy.

“They usually have me on the other side of the nation.” Tier said turning towards Xin and Rale. “Vieno, these are my traveling companions, you remember Rale?”

“It has been years.” Rale said bowing also.

“Silly boys, you don’t bow to me, my lords.” She looked at Xin. “And who is this lady who travels with you?”

“This is Xin, from the Dhaul region.” Tier hesitated. “She’s traveling with us till we reach Sandau.”

“I’m no lady.” Xin said quickly. Vieno’s eyebrows arched and she smiled before turning towards Rale.

“Fatira will take you to your quarters to clean up and rest. Dinner is at sunset.”

One of the younger women stood, curtsied, and strode off towards a side door in the courtyard. After a moment’s hesitation, Rale followed. As the door closed behind him, a youth burst through running towards them, sliding to a stop, his eyes wide.

“Your highness,” he bowed, gasping for breath. “Lord Chiron request your presence in the meeting hall.” He looked up. “The officials insisted.”

“Chiron is always impatient.” Vieno said.

Tier turned towards Xin, eying her for a long moment. “Vieno,”

“Go on, highness, before Chiron loses his temper. I’ll make sure Lady Xin is comfortable.” Vieno gave a bow and then a shooing motion.

Xin watched him walk away with the servant and turned to face Vieno.

“You look very tired, young woman. Come with me.” Vieno smiled warmly, turned and walked back the way she’d come. Xin took a deep breath and followed the elegant woman.

 

“He does not usually travel with others.” Vieno was saying as she made a final adjustment to the dress she’d insisted Xin wear.

“So I have gathered.” Xin shifted, uncomfortable. The dress was a set of loose pieces of fabric, secured by just a few stitches here and there. They flowed around her with each step, yet were so light weight she felt as though she wore nothing. Secured at her shoulders, the dress left her arms bare, gathered at her waist the skirts covered her legs to her ankles which Vieno had insisted be decorated with thin golden chains.

“He is an awful lair.” Vieno said directly. “You were not planning to go to Sandau.”

“He is an awful liar.” Xin agreed laughing. “But yes, I have family in Sandau.” She resisted the urge to twirl in the dress and met Vieno’s gaze. The older woman’s eyes narrowed.

“I will believe you, if you insist.” She said finally. “Come, sit, your hair needs fixing.”

Xin slowly reached up, clasping both hands over her bun.

“I won’t cut it, girl. Pull out the hair stick and let’s see it.” Vieno moved the chair closer.

Xin swallowed and did so. Her hair fell out of the bun and Vieno nodded. “You take good care of it. Good. Now sit.”

“Lady Vieno, this dress, the anklets, it’s all much too fine for me.”

“You are a guest, and you travel with an Imperial Prince. You need to look the part. Besides, I saw the way he looked at you, I know you aren’t blind, you saw it too.”

“He is an Imperial Prince. I am nothing.” Xin said as she sat. “It wouldn’t be,” she floundered her cheeks heating up.

“He does not think you are nothing.” Vieno began to carefully comb through Xin’s hair. “Things could happen.” She chuckled. “He is not a bad looking man.”

“No, he’s not.” Xin agreed, annoyed when the woman chuckled. “Still, what would be the point? When we get to Sandau we will go our separate ways.” She couldn’t think about returning to Nekar. Despite what he said, she couldn’t trust Seeress.

“He is a lonely man.” Vieno said and set the comb to one side and began to do something with Xin’s hair that involved pulling, lifting and twisting. “He came to Delebeg as a young boy, left a man and in all that time he was alone. Even now, second in command of the Imperial Army in the East, he is alone. Few friends,”

“What about Rale?” Xin asked.

“They are cousins and happen to get along.” Vieno did something and Xin cringed, pain shooting through her scalp. “Sorry. Tier does his duty and that’s it. You are good for him.”

“That’s all he lives for, he said as much.” Xin said softly.

“You have given him something else to think of besides duty.” Vieno stepped back and nodded with a smile. “Look in the mirror girl.”

Xin hesitated and stepped in front of the body length piece of metal and stared. The woman standing in the mirror couldn’t be her, could it? She smoothed the skirt over her front and blinked when the reflection did the same. Vieno had twisted her hair into a myriad of braids that looped and draped, working in a string of pearls which stood out against her dark hair.

“Would it be so awful to be with him? Even for a short period of time?” Vieno asked gently.

Xin couldn’t answer. She stared at the mirror, not really seeing her reflection. Tier had been in her thoughts, invading her sleep. It was stupid. What if the Seeress decided to have her put to death? He would be the one to do it.

“He does his duty. He serves the Empire, the Seeress,”

“He is on a mission for the Seeress.” Xin looked at the older woman. Vieno frowned.

“I did not know that.” She shook her head. “That is a death sentence.”

“So I’ve heard.” Xin looked down. “It wouldn’t,” she couldn’t continue.

“This is not good.” Vieno tightened something on the dress. “It is a death sentence to be asked to do her work. Especially outside the Empire.”

“Surely some have survived, I would think if anyone could, he would!”

“Indeed.” But Vieno was still frowning. “What has she asked him to do? No, I’ll ask him myself.”

“If it’s a death sentence, and everyone is afraid of her, why,”

“Do we still follow her?” Vieno took a deep breath. “Because the alternative is much worse.”

“Is it?” Xin shook her head.

“Hush.” Vieno lowered her voice. “There are some things one doesn’t discuss, she can find things out at a great distance, and there are many mice within the palace walls.”

Xin turned meeting the woman’s dark eyes. They studied each other.

“Be careful what you say, and to whom. Dhaul is relaxed, less a part of the empire than a tributary. Words, the wrong ones, in front of the wrong person, can get you killed.

“I’ll try to keep that in mind.” Xin murmured.

“There are some things you should be aware of, customs you must adhere to.” Vieno said. “All eyes will be on you.”

“Oh lovely.”

~*~

The rest of chapter 9 will be posted Tues, July 22th. Sorry y’all, it was just way too long. 

If you’re enjoying it, please share, spread the word, I’d appreciate it.

Want more to read? Check out J.A. Marlow’s Summer Crash serial!

Thanks for reading. :)

(c) 2014 Necia Phoenix

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Elemental Truth – Chapter 8

Zander

Originally published at Necia Phoenix. You can comment here or there.

Disclaimer;  Elemental Truth, the first of the Elemental Wars books, is in the final stages of editing.  Hope you all enjoy it.

 

 

Chapter 8

 

They left in the predawn light, following the trail back down to the crossroads. When they reached it, Xin stared at the path that wound it’s way back down to the village she’d grown up in. She couldn’t go back. Ever. Her stomach twisted. She turned, looking up at Tier.

“I’ll accompany you, for now.” She sighed.

Tier inclined his head. Rale extended his hand. “Ride behind me. Save your feet.”

Xin snorted but stepped over. “I’ve never ridden a horse before.”

“We’ll go slow.” Rale assured her as she clumsily got up behind him. She gripped his belt, hoping her shaking wouldn’t be obvious.

“The next town, we’ll see about getting you a horse.” Rale craned his neck, looking at her over his shoulder.

Xin nodded, belatedly realizing he couldn’t see her. “All right.”

 

They followed the twisting road, farther than Xin had been. Passing between steep cliffs and down into a narrow, eerily silent valley. Trees with ruddy red trunks towered over them and mist clung to the ground. The men were tense and Xin watched Tier closely. Several times he looked off into the forest, brows pulled together, staring at something. Rale said nothing about it, Xin hesitated to ask. They reached a wide, shallow stream, and Tier pulled his horse to a halt.

“Let’s stop here, water the horses and eat.” He said, his voice low.

“It feels heavy here.” Rale said. His horse stopped, ears flickering back and forth. Xin slid off, and limped back from the horse. Her legs trembled.

She made her way towards the stream, picking her way around several boulders trying to walk out the odd feel to her legs. The water whispered to her, dancing along her mind. She crouched, glancing back at the men. They were looking at a parchment, talking in low voices. She sighed and dipped her fingers in the water.

It was cold, soothing. She closed her eyes listening. The road followed along side the stream for quite a distance, almost to the lake, she knew that from the map, and could feel it in her mind. She frowned. She heard, no she felt percussions rippling through the water. She straightened, staring upstream. The sound of horses moving through the water was carried on the current. She swallowed. Bandits.

“Bandits, upriver.” She called to the men. “Four maybe five. I think there might be more in the forest.”

Tier was on his feet, sword drawn before she finished. Rale drew his slender sword and they both moved toward the stream bank. Xin crept towards the large boulders beside the stream, the sounds of splashing reaching her. Around the bend, their armor ragged and mismatched, came bandits that appeared to have had far better days. Their horses appeared underfed and scraggly. Tier lowered his sword. They halted, exchanging startled looks, their horses sidestepping, ears flat on their heads.

“Your money and the woman and you may pass.” One of the men called.

“Or you’ll do what?” Tier scoffed. “Bat at us with those toy blades?”

The bandits hissed back and forth, and Xin stared at the water around the horses hooves.

“We’ll kill you.”

“You can try, won’t get very far.” Rale called. Xin shot him a startled look, he didn’t look the type. Tier chuckled and shook his head.

“You won’t succeed. Go back where you came from, you won’t get anything from us.”

“Noblemen from Nekar, all alone, in the middle of nowhere.” One of the men with finer clothing than the others leaned forward. “Put your toy swords away and hand over your money. We might even share the woman….Oww.”

Xin directed a large chunk of half frozen ice at the man, hitting him in the chest and knocking him off the A blob of ice shot from the water slamming into the man’s chest. He fell back and hit the iced over stream, his horse spooked, darting from the stream, circles of ice around his hooves. The other horses followed their fellow, dashing onto the shore, leaving their startled riders behind in the stream.

The panicked horses tangled with bandits trying to run out from the forest in an ambush. Xin turned her attention back to the bandits who had been dumped by their terrified mounts. She focused, freezing the surface of the water around them and muttered one of Matau’s favorite oaths. The man she’d hit with the ice got to his feet, just out of range of her ice. She stepped forward and focused on the water around his legs, freezing it as fast as she could. He yowled, struggling to yank his legs free.

Xin tossed a few ice balls at the other men trying to keep them from the fray onshore. The leader yowled in frustration. The others were working themselves loose. Xin couldn’t keep the water frozen. Her head was pounding and she could feel sweat beading on her face. She’d never used her ability like this, though she’d heard stories and tried small ice balls late at night when no one was looking.

With a yell the bandits broke and fled back into the forest. Xin sank to the ground shaking, her head heavy. The leader was dragging himself out of the water, his legs encased in ice chunks. He yelled something she didn’t catch and half ran, half limped into the safety of the forest.

Xin forced herself to her feet. They might be just out of sight, watching and regrouping. She made her way back over to the men. Several of the bodies lay on the ground, blood seeping around them. Xin gritted her teeth, her stomach doing a dangerous flop. Tier touched her shoulder.

“You okay?”

Xin blinked and looked up at him, nodding mutely.

“We’ll get going here in a moment.” He grimaced, rubbing his thumb. It looked odd.

“You hurt?”

He shrugged. “I’ll live.”

“Dislocated your thumb again?” Rale shook his head. “The healers in Lorn could have fixed that.”

Tier scowled at him. “Let those crazies cut my hand open. No.”

“One of the horses got tangled in the underbrush.” Rale pointed.

“Payment for the inconvenience.” Tier looked at Xin. Looks like you have a horse now, my lady.”

Xin snorted, looking at the ragged beast. “Let’s hope it lives.”

“It,” Tier half bent, looking under the beast’s belly. “She, will probably live longer in our care than with those incompetent fools.”

 

Rale helped Xin get to know her new mount while Tier wrapped his hand, securing his thumb with a rarely used brace, swearing under his breath. The bandit’s sword hit his at just the right angle. It wasn’t the first time it had happened. It probably wouldn’t be the last. Once it was secure he gathered the weapons that looked usable and watched Rale going over some basic riding skills. The poor woman was pale.

“You think you can ride solo, or do you want to give it some time?” Tier asked.

“I’ll be fine. Thank you.” Her voice didn’t sound like she’d be fine at all but he wasn’t about to push her. His head was ringing from the power she’d been using. It troubled him. He shouldn’t be able to feel it, should he? She shook the thought off, it led to other, dangerous questions. Questions he wasn’t sure he wanted the answers to.

They rode on, going slow at first, then a bit faster as they neared the foothills of the mountains separating Dhaul from the desert province of Delebeg. They reached the bottom of the pass and found a small abandoned town. The thatch roofs had fallen into rickety shells of houses whose owners abandoned them. They found what might have once been an inn, and a stable yard able to secure the horses. They left early to reach the peak of the pass.

The passage up the pass was narrow and clogged with rocks and at the peak Rale and Xin both suggested they rest before going back down the other way. A stone hut provided them with shelter, and a view of the valley stretching out below.

Tier took the first shift, though they hadn’t seen any more bandits, they were out there, resentful and angry. He didn’t want to give them any chance to do anything. He’d settled against the outside wall when Xin approached him. She looked as if she were about to say something but instead she sighed, moving as though to go back inside.

“Something on your mind?” He asked. She half turned, looking up at him.

“How much further to Delebeg?”

He peered into the dark valley below. “Do you see those lights in the distance?”

She was quiet. He wished the moon was out so he could get a better glimpse of her face. Her hair was brushing his face, and arm and he was tempted catch it and braid it or something. He gripped his sword belt instead. It was safer.

“That’s Delebeg?” She sounded forlorn. Tier inwardly sighed. He wasn’t sure what to do, how he might help her feel better.

“It’s about four days, possibly five depending on how the horses do.”

“It’s dry down there. I can feel it.” she shuffled her feet.

“What’s it like?” He asked. He should send her back to bed, but he didn’t want her to leave just yet.

“What? Water using?”

“Yeah.” He hesitated. He almost mentioned being able to feel when she used her powers, but the words stuck in his throat. Now wasn’t the time.

“It’s an irresistible pull.” She said after a long silence. “It’s a whisper in the back of my mind that never quite goes away. If I’m not careful I could end up going under.” She shuddered.

“Going under?”

“Getting lost in the call of the water. There were stories Matau told me about, stories of water users who were unable to resist the call of the water. They either disappeared or drowned.”

Tier wasn’t sure what to say.

“I think if there wasn’t such a harsh punishment for just being what we are, it wouldn’t have consumed them.” Her voice was almost inaudible.

“The law,” Tier began but she interrupted.

“What if the law is wrong?” She asked softly. “Have you ever considered that? Not all laws are right, just because they’re laws.” She touched his arm, a feather touch that sent shock waves through him. “It means that the people in power want it done that way.”

He considered that.

“Good night, Tier.” She went silently and he couldn’t think of anything to say to bring her back.

He stared out into the darkness considering what she had said, and what she hadn’t. He’d never worried about it, never even thought about it. The law was the law. But that law dictated that he should put her to death. The law determined she was not a person, just an evil being.

The Seeress had ordered him to seek out the elementals. Would she also order him to kill them? And if she did, could he really do it? He’d never questioned his orders. Never doubted that the Seeress knew what was right for Nekar, for their people.

And yet she gave him chills, nightmares, and there were times he could almost feel her near him. Her fingernail dragging slowly down his chest, her voice whispering in his head. It left an oily, grimy feel that he hadn’t been able to wash away. If she suspected he was doubting her, doubting the laws he’d enforced his entire adult life, his life wouldn’t be worth living. She’d make sure of it. The question Xin asked earlier hung in his mind, nagging at him. If he was ordered to, could he kill her? For the first time in his life, he didn’t know the answer. Confused, troubled he stayed long past when he was supposed to wake Rale. When he finally went inside he was no closer to an answer.

~*~

The next chapter will be posted Tues, July 15th.

If you’re enjoying it, please share, spread the word, I’d appreciate it.

Want more to read? Check out J.A. Marlow’s Summer Crash serial!

Thanks for reading. :)

(c) 2014 Necia Phoenix

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An apology

Zander

Originally published at Necia Phoenix. You can comment here or there.

Real life pounced me pretty hard last week, and this week is no better. However, next Tuesday the Serial will be back on schedule. I hope I didn’t lose you, and I deeply apologize for my silence regarding it.

N. Phoenix

 

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Elemental Truth – Chapter 7

Zander

Originally published at Necia Phoenix. You can comment here or there.

Disclaimer;  Elemental Truth, the first of the Elemental Wars books, is in the final stages of editing.  Hope you all enjoy it.

 

Chapter 7

Xin watched from her bedroll as the prince returned to his, a small wooden box in his hands. He pulled out several small old looking scrolls and skimmed over their contents before pulling out a thin chain with a strange amulet on it. He stared at it with that deep frown, his thumb brushing over its face before tucking it into his belt pouch.

“Where did you find those?” Xin asked. He didn’t look her way, though his eyebrow quirked. He unrolled another scroll.

“Upstairs, hidden under a stone.” He shook his head.

“Did a ghost show you where it was?” Xin asked, half teasing. She hesitated. He paled and glanced at her, his dark eyes unreadable. She swallowed, heart hammering in her ears and scanned the large hall. “Are there any floating around right now?”

“No.” He looked back down at the pile of scrolls, brows pulling together, and lifted a small black scroll. “Interesting.” He murmured, unrolling it.

“What is it?” Xin scooted over to get a better look. It was, she told herself, to avoid waking up Rale.

“This is a summons scroll.” Tier said, frowning as he scanned over the contents. “It’s a request to go to meet with the Seeress.”

“Don’t the Nekarians worship her?” Xin asked.

“Some do.” He rolled the scroll tightly and set it in the bottom of the box before returning the other scrolls atop it. “They say she has guided and protected Nekar for a thousand years.”

“Killing any who oppose her.” Xin snorted.

“No.” Tier shook his head. “Her visions have guided our people, sometimes sacrifices must be made.”

“It seems tyrannical to me. What happens if her orders are ignored? Perhaps peace would break out?”

“The Empire could be diminished.” He closed the box, tucking it into his travel pack. He rummaging through the bag, frowning. “She gives orders for the betterment of the Empire. We are just tools.”

“Do you really believe that?” Xin asked. He looked at her, surprised.

“Of course.”

Xin frowned. “If it wasn’t your duty to locate and return living elementals to her, would you kill me?” Xin asked in a low voice. Tier stilled, eyes darting back to his travel sack.

“I would do my duty.” He said slowly. “But if she hadn’t ordered me here, I would not have needed a guide, nor been in this part of the world.” He lifted an unlit torch, stood and went to the torch in the wall, lighting the new one off the old.

“Is that all there is?” Xin swallowed, scrambling to her feet.

“Hmm?” He strode across the room, lifting the torch above his head. Xin followed at a distance. She didn’t want to wake up Rale.

“Duty, is that all there is to you?”

“Mostly.” He glanced down at her then pointed to the mural and set the fresh torch in the empty holder beside the mural. He stepped back, staring up at the wall.

“Mostly?” Xin shook her head. “I would’ve expected to hear tales of court gossip and exploits of the nobility.”

He looked at her and laughed “From Rale, from my brother or sister, yes you’d get an earful. I avoid it personally.”

“Why?”

“Court is a den of backbiting vipers. I don’t have the temperament for it.” He glanced her way. “As you pointed out, I’m a bad liar.” He tipped his head to one side and muttered an oath under his breath, going back to his travel packs. He returned with a folded and travel worn parchment. He lifted it up, eyes flickering back and forth between parchment and mural.

Xin looked at the mural, she’d always loved it. It was of woman holding her multicolored skirts in each hand in what may have been a curtsy. Her face was lost in the shadows and the plaster where her feet were had long ago crumbled. The skirt, though, was brightly colored, dotted with jewels, whispering of another time. Xin glanced at the parchment Tier was holding up and gasped, involuntarily stepping closer.

“You see it too?”

“It’s a map.” She looked up at him. “The mural’s a map!”

“It is, roughly. It’s missing some cities.” He pointed. “Lorn, Hagish, and the capital, and nothing is named. But look up there, those could be cities, they’re not on my map though. How old do you think this is?”

“I’m not sure. Matau had nothing to say about it.” Xin shrugged.

“Probably wasn’t exciting enough.” He said dryly.

Xin nodded, frowning. The colors on the skirt nibbled at her, reminding her of an old rhyme she’d been told long ago. She rubbed her forehead, trying to remember the words.

“Tier, that there,” she pointed to the parchment then to the equivalent on the mural. “That is Dhaul, right?”

“Yes.”

“It’s in blue, see? Delebeg is in brown…”

“So?”

“There was a song we used to sing as children, each elemental had a color assigned to them.” Xin said softly. “Earth was brown, air was white, water blue, fire,”

“Red.” He blinked looking at the map in his hands.

“It shows what regions the elementals occupied.” Xin looked up at him. “Might give you an idea of where you’re going to go next.”

Tier looked at her. “And where will you go?”

She shrugged. “I don’t know.” She stared towards the mural. “I haven’t given it much thought yet.”

“Come with us.”

Xin swallowed, unable to meet his eyes. “And eventually meet the Seeress?” She forced herself to look at him. “Who is responsible, ultimately, for my mother being run out, for me being in exile?”

He looked away and shook his head. “I don’t know what to say.” He looked back at her. “My mission, my life depends on me being able to locate elementals, and take them back to her. I can’t change the rules.”

She looked up towards the mural. “What does she want with us?”

“She claimed it was to heal damage from the Elemental War.”

“Claimed?” She frowned. “You doubt it?”

He scowled. “Questioning her can be fatal.”

“I have to think about it.”

“We’d have to go to Delebeg,” Rale’s voice made her jump. “It’s a straight shot from here.”

“I hate the desert.” Tier said folding the parchment and moving back towards their bedrolls.

“Chiron is governor of Delebeg isn’t he?” Rale’s asked.

“He was last I heard. I don’t hear much from that area though. I know he had some sort of uprising near his northern borders.”

“And after Delebeg?”

“Depends on if we locate an Earth Elemental. There are a couple small towns north of Delebeg we can check. After that, I don’t know.”

Xin barely heard Rale’s reply, she studied the mural. There were other colors edging the skirt and then there was the odd blot in the south/bottom part of the dress. Nekar, home of the Seeress. Xin shuddered glancing towards the fire. The men were deep in conversation, discussing other possible places to go, neither seemed to notice her.

She drifted towards the entry, glanced back at the fire one last time before ducking into the now soggy courtyard. She felt the call of the water and struggled to resist it. Everything that had happened, the flash flood, the rocks, crashed down on her. She forced herself to breathe. She wasn’t going to cry, she wouldn’t let herself cry. What was the point?

Matau tried to kill her. She shouldn’t have been surprised, he was one of the first to run her mother out, but Xin was still having a hard time believing it. He would have killed her if Tier hadn’t stepped in the way. She owed him her life. That didn’t sit well with her.

Was that any better a fate than being stoned? It was Tier’s duty to find people like her and turn them over to the Seeress. And if he didn’t… Xin sighed. The seeress was not known for being understanding.

Tier intrigued her. He was the Seeress’s chosen seeker, like the stories whispered in the dunurch late at night. He would do her bidding, and according to the old ones, eventually die in her service.

None survived for long, the old men had said, few could stand being in the Seeress’s presence for long. Fewer still able to walk away from a mission unscathed. She leaned back against a large block that faced the front gates, and stared up at the stars peeking from the clouds. What in the world was she going to do? She pulled her legs up on the rock, wrapping her arms around her legs and propping her chin on her knees. She felt the tears, the sobs, the reality of her awful situation and pressed her forehead against her knees crying.

The storm of tears passed, and she shivered in the chill air. She needed to get back to her bedroll, get some sleep and try to decide in the morning where she was going to go. Something was draped over her shoulders, she looked up blinking in surprise. Tier was standing just an arm’s length away.

“It’s kind of cold out here.” He said adjusting the blanket he’d draped over her shoulders. “Are you alright?”

She shrugged staring up at the moon. “He tried to kill me. He would have too if you and Rale hadn’t…” She gripped the blanket tightening it around her shoulders.

She could almost feel how awkward he must be feeling. She pressed her forehead against her knees again fighting sobs. She felt his hand resting on her shoulder, attempted comfort from a man who would kill her in a heartbeat?

“Rale is asleep again.” He said, the tone of his voice had an odd timbre to it. “Come back inside where it is warmer.” he was gently rubbing her back, the soothing caress was making her drowsy.

“If I go with you, after all this is over, where will I go?” she whispered. She looked at him, barely a shadowy outline in the darkness.

“We’ll figure that out later. Right now you ought to get to sleep.”

“You too.” She said sharply, but she slid off the rock gripping the blanket.

“Possibly.” he said. He followed her back inside and Xin wondered what he saw that she didn’t. When she turned to ask she found herself spun back around to face the fire, his hands steel on her shoulders. “You don’t want to know what I see, Xin.”

~*~

The next chapter will be posted Thurs, July 3rd.

If you’re enjoying it, please share, spread the word, I’d appreciate it.

Want more to read? Check out J.A. Marlow’s Summer Crash serial!

Thanks for reading. :)

(c) 2014 Necia Phoenix

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Elemental Truth – Chapter 6

Zander

Originally published at Necia Phoenix. You can comment here or there.

Disclaimer;  Elemental Truth, the first of the Elemental Wars books, is in the final stages of editing.  Hope you all enjoy it.

 

Chapter 6

The great Fortress of Dhaul loomed overhead, intimidating and dreary, casting a shadow and a chill over the road coiling towards its gate. Ancient towers spiraled up, their tips hidden in ever present dark and ominous clouds. Like the cracked, carved stones lining the road, they were silent sentinels of another time. An eerie testament of a long gone era.

“Matau told me that it was shaped out of the cliff, not carved nor built.” Xin said, her voice hushed. She nodded towards the fortress. “It was a trade, you see, the water users ended a drought in a northern kingdom, so in return the rock shapers came south and created the fortress for them. The entire summit is a palace.”

“I wonder why Nekar let the fortress fall into ruin. Especially after going to the trouble of aquiring it.” Rale murmured. Tier shrugged.

“General Dyrnos, or one of the history teachers in Lorn could tell you. I never paid that much attention.” Tier pointed at the moss covered stone pillars lining either side of the road, like soldiers ready to march into battle. “Would you want to have those things staring at you every day?”

Rale shook his head. “I don’t like to think our people would be superstitious enough to let that sort of thing bother them.” He patted one of the stones. “They’re just stone, after all.”

Tier shrugged. Every now and then, beneath the underbrush and twining around the pillars, he’d catch sight of wisps, clinging to the broken stones. Things watching them. Perhaps there was a connection between the ghosts and the stones? Part of him wanted to linger and inspect them, another part of him wanted to run as fast as he could.

“What are those stones, anyways?” Rale asked Xin, pointing to a nearby pillar. An ugly face was carved into its surface. “I’ve never seen anything like them before.”

“Matau called them Standing Stones, and said they were here before people came to Dhaul. No one knows what the language is, or who or what put them there. Come on, it’s getting late. I’d rather not be on the road at night.”

“Why not? Worries about ghosts?” Rale asked her.

“There are things that move around in the forest.” She motioned towards the trees. “Some say ghosts, or demons. I’ve never seen anything, but I’ve heard things.” She shuddered. “I prefer not to travel here at night.”

“What do you think, Tier? Think we’ll see anything?” Rale asked.

Tier tried to ignore his cousin’s jabbering.

“Tier sees ghosts.” Rale said. Tier glared at him. It wasn’t something to laugh or joke about. In the wrong company it could get him killed. He never talked about it and wished Rale wouldn’t. “When we were children he swore he saw bodies in the river near the Seeress’s Oracle.”

“Overactive imagination.” Tier said quickly. Xin was looking at him with a frown. “I was a child.”

“So,” she drawled. “You don’t see ghosts?”

“No.” He turned from her.

“The ghosts here are real, not imaginary. They get restless when people come up here.”

“Any idea why?” Rale asked.

Xin was quiet before answering. “The Nekarian army slaughtered everyone inside the palace, once the wall was breached. No one was spared. Elemental, non-elemental. Young, old, male female. It didn’t matter. Everyone died.”

Tier nodded. “That is what happens in war.”

“Their souls are still here.” She turned and continued up the path. “We’d better hurry before it starts raining again.”

Neither of the horses wanted to go anywhere near the front gates that towered over the trees. It took Rale and Tier quite some time to get them on the wide yard in front of the fortress. Xin perched herself on a rock, her knees drawn up under her. When they finally convinced the beasts that it wouldn’t hurt them the light was dimming in the sky. Tier couldn’t see any way to open the gates. He turned to Xin.

“How do we get in?” He asked. Before she could answer, Rale was pushing the reins in Tier’s hand, half stumbling toward the gate.

“Are you seeing this?” He turned, eyes wide. “It’s huge!”

“You, prince, are a horrible liar.” Xin said in a low voice. Tier blinked, looking down at her.

“Why do you say that?” He asked warily. She flashed a grin at him.

“Your eyes. The way you look in the forest, and at the Standing stones… you see the spirits here, don’t you?”

He gritted his teeth, saying nothing. She laughed.

“There are lots of ghosts here. Lots of things here. I don’t envy you.”

“How do we get inside?” He repeated the question. She eyed him, her eyes twinkling. She was laughing at him, he was certain of it.

She pointed towards the wall. “Along that wall is the breach that the Nekarian army used to take the castle.”

“Lets go then.”

Rale hurried over, taking the reins back, rambling about the fortress. The breach appeared to have some minor repair work, but it was never completed. It was wide, high, and both horses were convinced that there was an ogre on the other side, just waiting to eat them. Tier glanced over at Xin.

“Lead the way?”

She stepped through the breach, Rale on her heels. Tier swore under his breath, trying to get the horses through. Once on the other side, they calmed down, though their eyes were wide and their ears pricked forward. They would bolt the minuet he let his guard down.

He barely got a glimpse around, before Xin was directing him to an old stableyard. Once secured inside the horses calmed down and Tier rejoined Xin and Rale near a gaping doorway. The wind picked up as they stepped inside.

The room, an ancient hall, whispered of time. In the torchlight, Tier could make out broken swords, straw, and leaves blown in, littering the floor. The room was empty except for the large fireplace that dominated it. Tier made his way over, frowning at the remnants of a fire. It wasn’t very old. He glanced over at Xin.

“I thought you said people avoided this area.”

“They do.” She moved over and frowned, crouching by the fireplace. “Odd.”

“When you led the other lords up here,” Tier began.

“They wouldn’t come inside.” Xin said. She stood, setting her torch in a stone holder on one side of the fireplace. “Then they insisted on taking the road towards Delebeg.” she stared at the char. “It may have been bandits.”

“I thought you said bandits wouldn’t,” A loud crash drowned out the rest of Rale’s statement. He stared towards the back of the hall. “What was that?”

Tier stood, taking a visual survey of the lower room. Shapes were forming, hazy and indistinct, some were detailed most just the vague outlines of what they used to be. But all of them had the dark shadows for eyes.

“Tier, did you hear that?”

A rumble of thunder shook the palace. Tier almost jumped when he felt the touch to his arm. He looked down at Xin who was staring towards the way they’d come in, her hand rested on his arm. Warmth wiggled through him and he smothered it. Couldn’t read too much into it.

“Wind probably knocked something down my lord.” Xin said, looking sharply at Rale. She sounded as if she were trying to be cheerful. “Over by the entry is fire wood, why don’t you grab it so we can get a fire started.”

Rale nodded and Tier swallowed when his cousin turned and walked through several ghosts to get to the firewood.

“What do you see?” Xin whispered looking up at him.

“Be glad you don’t know.” Tier replied.

It didn’t take long to get the fire going. Xin enlisted Rale as her helper, ordering him to get things and cut up vegetables much to Tier’s amusement. It was, he thought, good for Rale to be away from the comforts of home. Maybe he might do more for himself.

“Why do I have to go get the water?” Rale asked belligerently. Xin looked up at him and his shoulders sagged. Tier was glad that he was not the only one affected by those large, innocent looking eyes. Xin was dangerous and knew it.

“My lord, have you ever cooked a meal before in your life?”

“No.”

“Then you go get the water.”

“You’re mean to him.” Tier said as his cousin stalked off. Xin glanced his way then back down to the makeshift cooking preparation area.

“I don’t have patience for a spoiled royal.” She didn’t meet his eyes. When Rale got back she was far less sharp with him, showing him how to add things to the small flat pot.

They ate in silence, setting up sleeping rolls on the floor near the fire. The storm raged outside. The thunder boomed, lightning lit up the room, shone through windows high up. With each flash he saw the pale figures, standing, staring. He swallowed. One in particular, a noblewoman or an ancient queen, got closer with each flash. He was certain the ancient spirit wasn’t moving. The ghost’s eyes glowed a bright silver, locked on him. He forced himself to lay back, to close his eyes and listen to the sounds of Rale and Xin talking in low voices.

You are not what you seem to be. The voice, hollow and wispy echoed inside his skull. His eyes shot open and saw the ghost floating above his feet. An unearthly wind blew her hair. Her face one minute was narrow, gaunt, with a timeless beauty to her, the next nothing more than a skull. These halls are not for you, Nekarian.

“Hey Tier, where do we go from here?” Rale asked from his sleeping bedroll.

“Hmm?” Tier blinked several times looking over at him. The ghost drifted between them.

“You were insistent on coming here, to Dhaul, now where to?”

“I’m not sure.” Tier shrugged, meeting the gaze of the ghost. “Seeress specified here but gave no suggestions about where we should go after here.”

The haunt stared at him, lips pursed. For a moment, in the flickering lightning he thought a twitch of a smile tugged at her ghostly lips. Then she was gone.
He stared towards the back wall, letting the icy tingles fade away. In the lightning strikes he realized there was a painting on the wall above the old dais. He half sat up frowning, waiting for the next lighting to strike.

“What is it?” Rale asked.

“There’s something painted on that wall.”

“It’s a mural.” Xin said. He looked over at her. She sat cross-legged, her hair down and over one shoulder. “In the light, when there aren’t storms you can get a better view.” She braided her hair quickly and then sat staring at the fireplace. Rale harrumphed and rolled over.

“Gotta sleep.” he muttered.

Tier laid back down half closing his eyes. They were in an unknown place, possibly dangerous. He would doze, but not be fully asleep. Years of training, habit and experience wouldn’t let him. Either way, when he dozed he dreamed; odd, disturbing dreams of both the Seeress and Xin.

When he woke, his heart was pounding loudly in his ears and he felt as if something had made a loud sound. He stared towards the doorway, listening to the rain pouring down outside. It took time before his body had unclenched enough for him to roll over to his other side. Xin was facing him, her eyelashes dark against her pale cheek. Tier bit back a curse and sat up staring into the darkness. The ghosts were gone, except for the queen hovering near the stairs.

He glanced back down at Xin and then to Rale, neither one had moved. He stood and carefully took the torch from its holder and crept over to the regal looking ghost. She smiled, half beauty half skull, turned and drifted up the stairs. He took one last glance towards Xin and Rale before following her up the old wide steps. She led him through the upper levels of the palace, down long ago forgotten passages finally ending up in what was once a wine cellar. She stopped over a black patch on the floor, staring at him.

What is it you seek here? Her voice echoed hollowly in his mind. He felt the presence of other spirits gathering in the room. Many, far more than he could actually see. The air grew chilled and he had to grit his teeth to keep them from chattering.

“Information.” He gritted out. A murmur went through the room, a ghostly whisper tinged with mockery. They didn’t believe him.

Liar. You seek other Elementals.
“Why ask me if you knew already?”

No elementals, besides your water girl, have come here in years. Perhaps they’re all dead.

“Perhaps they are just hiding. Where did the other old fortresses stand? Dhaul is the last I know of.”

The specter became harder even for him to see. Then she was gone. Tier swore under his breath. All the other spirits departed with a howl.

“Just like a ghost. Afraid.” The air in the room went chilly but the Queen did not reappear. Tier stared at the blackened spot on the floor. He looked around the room. Empty except for bits of blackened char and rocks.

There was a great battle here. The queen’s voice echoed in his mind again. For a moment he could hear the sounds of swords clashing, men yelling, the groans and screams of the dying and the relentless and endless clang of two great swords. Briefly he saw the two, fighting over the blackened flagstone.

No one remembers who they were, only that they hated each other, they fought each other and they killed each other right here.

Tier squinted and knelt beside the blackened stone, running his hand over the scorched block. There was a crack. He debated and pulled his belt knife out using it to slide between the flagstones and carefully pry it up. There was a large cache beneath the flagstone with a single small wooden chest. Tire lifted it, and felt a tingling, a release of an ancient ward.

The chest was simple, a basic latch with no lock kept it closed. Dark stains covered the lid and Tier was certain it was blood that had leaked down through the cracks. He replaced the flagstone and stood, finding himself face to face with the queen.

These are the only records left of that time. The queen moved through him and led him back up to the corridor at the top of the stairs. Be careful with them.

 

~*~

The next chapter will be posted Thurs, June 26th.

If you’re enjoying it, please share, spread the word, I’d appreciate it.

Want more to read? Check out J.A. Marlow’s Summer Crash serial!

Thanks for reading. :)

(c) 2014 Necia Phoenix

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Elemental Truth – Chapter 5

Zander

Originally published at Necia Phoenix. You can comment here or there.

Disclaimer; Elemental Truth, the first of the Elemental Wars books, is in the final stages of editing. Hope you all enjoy it.

 

Chapter 5

 

Thunder shook the small cabin, jolting Tier from an uneasy dream. He pushed himself up, glancing around the one room. The fire had burned down, leaving long shadows. He could make out the forms of Rale and the old man, and from the sound of it, neither were aware that there was a storm outside. Xin’s sleeping mat was empty. Thunder rumbled again and he got to his feet taking another glance around before ducking out the door, onto the porch. Xin was leaning against one of the posts, and glanced at him as he shut the door.

“The horses are still there,” she said motioning towards the shelter. “They don’t look too pleased.”

“They’re out of the rain, at least.” Tier said. Lightning flashed, and he could make out the shapes of the horses under the shelter.

“True.”

“The road’s on the other side of the stream, isn’t it?”

“Yes. The water runs off quickly, though. We’ll be alright.” She leaned on the railing. “This cabin has been here for a long time and has weathered many a nasty storm.”

“How often do you come up here?” Another flash of lightning illuminated the area and his skin prickled, hair was standing on end as icy fingers clawed up his spine. In the light of the flickering lightning, gathered on the edge of the clearing were the ghosts. Substantial, mostly formed. They were just staring at him with dark hollows for eyes. He ran an impatient hand through his hair, trying to look anywhere but at them, aware of Xin’s close scrutiny.

“When I can get away. It’s far more pleasant on the mountain than down in the village.” She turned towards him. “The next stretch is rough going, you might want to get back to sleep, your highness.”

He nodded looking back towards the stream. As the lightning flickered, he could see the stream, brim full of rushing water, and the insubstantial shapes drifting closer. He forced himself to breathe slowly.

“Shouldn’t you? Seeing as you are the guide?”

She laughed. “I could walk this trail with my eyes closed, your highness.”

“Drop the highness, please. It wears on the ears. I’m just Tier.” He leaned on the railing, staring towards the shapes. They’d rarely been this clear, it worried him. Was he going insane? Or did the Seeress do something to his head? He glanced at Xin. She’d tipped her head to one side.

“The other nobles we brought up here, reminded us all the time that they were ‘Lord’ whatever it was.” She looked towards the stream. “As if they’d break if they weren’t reminded that they were nobility.”

“Titles are an empty comfort.” Tier shrugged. “I’m not my title.”

She nodded slowly. “Goodnight, Tier.” She turned and went back inside.

He was about to follow her but hesitated, staring out at the wispy spirits drifting closer and wavering in the wind.

 

When he finally did get back to his mat it took some time to get back to sleep and his dreams were dark and confusing, fading away rapidly when he woke. Outside birds sang, the horses nickered, and the old man complained bitterly about his sore joints. Tier stared up at the rafters, listening. Xin snapped at the old man, though he couldn’t make out what she said, Matau snarled something back which was followed by a clattering of dishes.

“I wish that old man would lose his voice.” Rale groaned from his bedroll. Tier glanced over at him.

“Just another day, maybe two.” Tier pushed himself up, head feeling stuffed full of straw.

“How do we find out if she’s an elemental?” Rale asked in a low voice. “The old man…”

Tier shrugged. “I have no idea.” He was at a loss. How was he supposed to convince the young woman to leave everything and everyone she knew? He didn’t want to think about what might happen to her once he delivered her and any other elementals he might find, to the Seeress. Pressure against his mind, Xin was doing it again. He scrambled from beneath his blanket but the pressure stopped before he managed to get to the door. He needed to catch her using her powers. It was the only way he could think of to broach the subject.

With a sigh he resigned himself to pack things up. It took little time to repack the night gear and grab the saddles. Rale followed him, tousled and looking blearily around.

“Gods, the sun isn’t even properly up.” he groaned. Running a hand through his hair.

“Bad night?” Tier asked as he made his way over to the horses. Rale followed, hesitantly taking one of the saddles from Tier. Tier watched his cousin fumble with the saddle blanket, pleased. At least he was trying to help instead of complaining. Perhaps there was hope for the nobleman after all.

“Dreams. We were back in the Oracle and the Seeress clawing through my head.” Rale grunted as he lifted the saddle to the horse’s back. “Every time I tried to sleep, it was the same thing. I can still feel it.” He pulled on the girth strap and stepped back with a satisfied grin. The grin turned to a frown as the saddle slid around the barrel of the horse, hanging upside-down. The horse grunted, swinging his head to look at Rale. Tier swallowed a chuckle, patting his cousin’s shoulder.

“Good, for a first try.” Tier moved over to the horse, showing Rale how to fix it.

Laughter from the cooking fire startled him. Tier glanced at Xin, who crouched by the fire, grinning at them.

“Do you realize how backwards that is?” She asked standing up with two plates in hand. “The prince teaching someone how to saddle a horse.” She handed Rale one of the plates.

“Hey, I’ve never done this before, I’ve always had…” Rale halted, blinking several times. Staring at the plate she handed him. “Eggs? Where’d you get eggs?”

Xin handed Tier the other plate. “Bird nest, kind of lucky, I thought all the birds had already hatched their eggs.”

Rale looked down at the eggs, prodding them with one finger. “These were going to hatch?”

“If I hadn’t gotten to them? Yes, most likely.” She smiled at him. “Enjoy.”

Tier hastily made his way to the porch, snickering at the horrified look on Rale’s face.

“He would be helpless if he were out here by himself.” Xin commented as she went back to the fire. Tier watched her. Water user, cook, guide, smartass. For a brief moment he wondered what she would look like in finery befitting a Lady of the court and squashed that thought. With her large blue-gray eyes, pale complexion, and dark hair, he had no doubts she would catch the attention of most of the nobles. Just the idea made him uneasy. He ate his food silently, forcing himself to look at anything, anywhere but their guide and her grandfather who scowled at him from his seat across the fire.

“Knowing that a little bird was going to hatch from this…” Rale said as he came over perching himself on one side.

“Rale, eat it, and be glad it isn’t boot leather.” Tier advised.

 

The road twisted around old washouts, downed trees, and boulders that had been carried from higher up the mountain by flash floods. Matau and Xin led them up to a steep gully gashed into the mountain. The road ran along the side of it.

“Come on.” Matau growled limping down the bank and into the gully itself. He half turned scowling at them. “What are you waiting for?”

Tier glanced towards Xin. She was rooted on the bank, looking up the gully.

“Matau, let’s go to the bridge up further. It’d be safer.” She pointed at the dark clouds higher up the mountain. “I don’t like the look of those clouds.”

“It would take longer, Xin. I’m tired, that road is rockier than this stream bed. Come on.” Matau was almost to the middle of the gully. Rale stepped into it. Tier glanced back at Xin.

“He’s right. It is faster.” She looked up the gully. “I hate it when he’s right. Come on.”

“You don’t look like you believe he’s right.” Tier said. She looked at him, nibbling her lower lip.

“Just be cautious.” She shrugged and picked her way down the bank into the gully. Tier glanced towards the clouds and followed.

They’d almost reached the point Matau said they’d need to climb to get back to the road when he heard a low rumble. Xin swore.

“Get out of the stream, now!” She stood in the center of the gully, staring up the stream. Tier was aware of the others scrambling up the bank. Water rushing downstream made the ground rumble beneath his feet. Tier grabbed the young woman’s arm intending to haul her up the river bank, but she batted his hand away.

“It won’t hurt me.” She mumbled, barely audible over the roar of the water. Tier stared at the water, mind numb. Xin lifted a hand, palm facing the wall of water. “Stop.”

The water paused, rippling. Tier blinked several times, aware of Rale yelling from the bank.

“Go around.” Tier barely heard her say it, but the water lurched to their right, pouring around them, taking the rocks, trees and other debris with it. Tier backed towards the bank, tugging at Xin’s arm. She stepped backward, hand still out, not looking away from the water.

“You’re a water elemental!” Rale said in a hushed voice when they joined him and Matau on the road.

Xin lowered her hand, her face pale as she looked at the old man.

“You…” Matau’s voice wavered. “You’re just like your mother.”

Tier rested his hand on the Xin’s shoulder. He didn’t need her running off now, they’d never be able to find her, she knew the area too well.

“Are you going to dispense justice then?” Matau, glared openly at Tier. “You should! She’s an elemental!”

“She’s your grandaughter!” Rale exclaimed, stepping towards the old man.

“That didn’t stop him when he went after my mother.” Xin looked up at Tier.

Matau swore. “You’re no kin of mine!” He threw the bag of coins to the ground at her feet.

“Matau,” Xin’s voice tugged at Tier.

“She just saved our lives, old man.” He snapped. Matau raised his walking stick, using it to point at Tier.

“The laws you enforce, that your people laid upon us, must be kept! How long before she does something to kill one of us? They’re inhuman, possessed!” He turned, waving his cane. “Get you gone, your highness, and take the demon with you. I have no granddaughter. I had no granddaughter!”

Tier dropped his hand.

“Are you going to kill me then?” She turned, looking at him. She crossed her arms.

“We actually,” Rale faltered, looking back and forth between them. “Uhm…”

“I need your help.” Tier said cautiously. She was glancing toward the trees, planning to make a run for it. He didn’t want to frighten her into running off. A crazy part of him wanted her to willingly go with them.

She frowned at him. “What kind of help?”

“I’ve been ordered by the Seeress to locate elementals.” The silence was broken only by the horses and the distant voice of the old man cursing them all.

“Why?”

“She didn’t say.” Tier glanced towards stream.

“You don’t question the Seeress. You do as she says.” Rale said quickly. “We’re supposed to find one of each, and bring them back to her.”

“And then what? What happens to them?” Xin looked back and forth between them.

“I don’t know.” Tier admitted. She looked away.

“If I go with you…”

“Just a traveling companion.” He watched her expression flicker from wary to angry, concerned, frightened. “I still need to get to the fortress.”

“Why?”

“Orders.” He said it before he thought, but he felt a twinge in his mind. Had his mind been tampered with? The Seeress was crawling around in his head back at the oracle. Had she left orders? He inwardly shuddered at the thought. Xin frowned at him. Tier didn’t flinch, didn’t look away. A loose strand of her hair had come loose from the bun, and fell across her face. It was distracting. He resisted the urge to push it behind her ear.

“I’ll go with you, as far as the fortress.” She said. She turned, pushing the offensive strand back behind her ear, and glanced back at him. “We keep following the road, gentlemen.”

Rale handed him the bag of coins Matau dropped. “That didn’t quite go as planned.”

Tier glanced at his cousin. “We had a plan?”

Rale scowled. “Figuratively speaking.” He led his horse past Tier.

Tier watched Xin for a moment, fascinated by the way she moved; the sunlight on her hair. He smothered a sigh. He was distracted. He couldn’t afford to be distracted. Not with the Seeress breathing down his neck, not with an impossible mission to complete. He took a few steps, still watching her, his horse butting his shoulder impatient to get moving.

“I’m an idiot.” he muttered under his breath.

 ~*~

 

The next chapter will be posted Tues, June 24th.

If you’re enjoying it, please comment **bats eyes**, share, spread the word, I’d appreciate it.

Thanks for reading. :)

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Sunday Serenity

Zander

Originally published at Necia Phoenix. You can comment here or there.

Happy Father’s Day!

To both those who are fathers and those who have been there for kids who have needed a positive male influence in their lives;

Thank you.

Fatherhood/Guidance-hood, isn’t just about biology.

There have been, throughout my life, men who have inspired and encouraged me, My dad, my grandfather, a couple youth leaders at various churches I attended, teachers, neighbors, guys who are just decent guys trying to do their best. Some of them have NO idea how positively they influenced my life, some of them do know, because I told them.

So go tell an inspiring dude (whether he’s a father or not), how inspiring they’ve been to you and have a great day!

This song reminds me of both my dad and my husband (who is an awesome father)!

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Elemental Truth – Chapter 4

Zander

Originally published at Necia Phoenix. You can comment here or there.

This entry is part 4 of 4 in the series Elemental Truth

 

Disclaimer;  Elemental Truth, the first of the Elemental Wars books, is in the final stages of editing.  Hope you all enjoy it.*

Chapter 4

The old fortress road snaked back and forth up the side of the mountain, doubling back on itself several times. It was overgrown with pines, conifers, and an assortment of underbrush Tier was unfamiliar with. The road leveled out for about a quarter of a league before coming to a large pillar with carvings in a language he’d never seen before. The road they were on continued, disappearing over a rise. A smaller road, little more than a game trail shot off from the main one, twisting up the steep rise.

“What do those markings mean?” Rale asked Xin. She glanced toward the pillar and shrugged.
“I have no idea.” She pointed towards the game trail. “We go that way.”

Rale groaned. The trees were so close together and the branches so low they’d have to dismount and lead their horses through.

“Why?” He asked. Tier shook his head.

Xin half turned. “You want to get to the fortress, correct?” She pointed. “It’s at the top of the mountain. This is the only road to it.”

“The other road…”

“Takes you to Delebeg, past the path of the bandits.” The old man said, his voice impatient. “Xin, Slow down.”

Tier choked back a chuckle when the woman increased her pace.

“What was that Matau? I can’t hear you.” She paused by a tree and leaned against it. She inclined her head as Tier got closer.

“Enjoying yourself?” he asked. She shrugged.

“When he starts complaining, you’ll want to put as much distance between your ears and his mouth as you can.” she said, glancing towards Rale and Matau.

“You might want to give them a hand. That horse isn’t going to cooperate.”

Tier sighed, looking back. The old man and Rale were unsuccessfully trying to move the horse past a tree leaning over the trail. The beast was having none of it, jerking his head and pulling back. Tier handed the reins of his horse to Xin and picked his way back down the trail, removing his cloak as he went. When he reached the horse, he gently slid it over the frightened beast’s eyes from behind. The horse stiffened, body trembling and Tier spoke to it, taking the reins from Rale and urging the beast forward. It took a hesitant step forward, then another. Once they were past the tree stump he removed the cloak and handed the reins back to Rale.

“Show off.” Rale grumbled. Tier barely cast a glance his way, climbing back up the path. Xin was staring, wide eyed at his horse who was nuzzling at her.

“Is it going to bite me?” she whispered hoarsely.

Tier took the reins and shook his head. “No. He’s just being friendly.” He took a couple steps up the trail, glancing down at her. Her eyes were still wide. “Are you coming?”

Her eyes narrowed, jaw clenched. She pushed from the tree, moving past him and his horse, shooting him a dark look. He waited till she passed him to smile.

She wasn’t joking about Matau’s complaining. Everything was subject to being bitched about. From the weather, to the village to Nekar, and even the Seeress, the man was both a drain on the ears and well of information. Though most of it was twenty years old and the subjects were long dead and buried. His voice echoed off the trees and rocks as they neared the sheer cliffs at the base of the mountain, the shadows growing long and the sky turning a pale orange.

Against the base of the cliff was a small cabin facing the narrow stream. Tall pines blocked out much of the sky on the sharp slope, far too thick to see through. Tier took over taking care of the horses as his guides prepared the dinner. Rale hovered by the food, as if unsure of what to do next. Tier paused in his ministrations of the horses to watch Xin hand Rale a deep pan and told him to get some water. The silence was telling.

Rale stared at her, glancing down at the pan in his hands and looked back up at her.

“What?” She rested her hands on her knees, crouched and balancing on the balls of her feet. “The stream is right over there, go fill that.”
“Me?” His voice spoke volumes.

Xin narrowed her eyes, shooting a look at Tier. “Is he kidding?”

Tier shook his head, pulling the saddle and sweat soaked saddle blanket from Rale’s mount. “You should have seen the look on his face the first night we had to sleep on the ground.”

She looked back at Rale. “You walk over to the stream, dip the pan in it then bring it back here, full of water.”

Rale turned stiffly, shooting some very ugly looks Tier’s way, and did so. Tier finished with Rale’s horse, moved on to his, only half listening to the endless complaining of the old man. Out of the corner of his eye he could see a pale mist, drifting between the trees just beyond the treeline. His horse and Rale’s stilled, nickering softly, ears flicking back and forth. Tier ignored it, focusing on his horse, a fine war-bred beast that had taken him through many a battle.

He couldn’t avoid seeing it when he returned to the cabin with the saddles. Up the path they were to take in the morning, tendrils of mist crept down, towards the clearing. He hesitated on the porch. On either side of the path were old stones, carved in a similar fashion to the crossroads pillar. The mist kept distance from the stones. Deeper in the forest, as the shadows grew even longer, he saw the silvery shapes forming, and more mist crept down the path. He forced himself to look towards the stream, to ignore the tendrils of mist creeping into the clearing.

“Tier can I have a word with you?” Rale asked, he looked a touch disgruntled.

“Having fun?”

Rale snorted. “Why do we need guides?” he hissed. “You’re more than capable of getting us to the Fortress.”

Tier glanced towards the fire where Matau crouched, setting the tri-legged spider over the crackling flames. Xin handed him things to put into the pot. Her braided hair hung over one shoulder the end just above the dirt and she fiddled with it absently, staring back the way they’d come.

“The Seeress wanted us to start our search here, for a reason.” Tier said slowly. He looked back at Rale. “I think she knew something.” Rale shook his head.

“You think she’s an elemental?”  He hissed. “You do, don’t you?”

Tier hesitated. “I think there’s a chance she is. You heard what the old man said, her mother was a water elemental.”

Rale nodded, glancing back at their guides. “How do we…” he trailed off and looked at Tier. “What do we do next?”

“I don’t know. Wait and see.” Tier shrugged and pushed into the cabin, setting the saddles on the floor just inside the door. “What else can we do?”

 

 

 ~*~

The next chapter will be posted Tues, June 17th.

If you’re enjoying it, please share, spread the word, I’d appreciate it. Thanks for reading.  :)

(c) 2014 Necia Phoenix

 

 

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Elemental Truth – Chapter 3

Zander

Originally published at Necia Phoenix. You can comment here or there.

This entry is part 3 of 3 in the series Elemental Truth

Disclaimer;  Elemental Truth, the first of the Elemental Wars books, is in the final stages of editing.  Hope you all enjoy it.*

 

Chapter 3

The modest two level house sat atop a steep bluff overlooking the village to the south and the ocean to the east. A path along the side of the cliffs led to the beach below. In the back of the house was a small building and a grove of trees. Xin met them on the porch, nodding and pointing around back.

“The barn is back there, gentlemen.” She said meeting Tier’s gaze.

“Xin.” Matau’s voice was wearing on Tier’s ears. The man rattled on about people and scandals that meant nothing to him.

“This way.” Xin motioned them to follow, stepping from the porch without a glance back. She led them to the shed, which was surrounded by a fence in dire need of repair.

“Does he always talk that much?” Tier asked. Xin glanced up and him and grinned.

“Just think, your highness, three or four days of that.”

“Gods help us.” Tier muttered.

“Try living with it.” She snickered.

Tier led the horses into the small yard, making sure it was going to be secure enough. With the talk of bandits he wondered if there were any reports of raids. Behind him, Rale was attempting some small talk. Tier shook his head, his cousin had a lot to learn about traveling incognito.

“This place could use some work.” Rale commented.

“Matau’s too old to do the repairs, he won’t let me do it, and no one will come do them for us.” Xin shrugged. “So it falls apart.”

“Why won’t any anyone come up to help?” Rale asked. Xin stared at him. “Is it too far up the hill?”

Tier turned back to his horse, pulling the saddle and blanket from it’s back, and giving him a good scratch. The warhorse grunted, appearing to enjoy the attention. He listened for Xin’s response. The silence stretched, broken only by the nickering of the horses.

“None of your business.” Xin said.

Tier glanced around in time to see her walking back across the yard to the house. He frowned. It started sprinkling as they were coming up the hill, yet her clothes were dry. He stared. He wasn’t exactly soaked, but was a bit more moist than he liked. Xin’s clothes weren’t even wet. He rubbed the bridge of his nose.

“I was just trying to be friendly.” Rale said, interrupting his thoughts.

“After insulting her in the dunarch? Not a wise move, Rale.”

Rale opened his mouth then closed it. Tier shot him a dark look and pointed towards the other horse, still saddled. “It’s your turn to take care of your horse.”

They set their packs on shelves in the entry and stepped into the main room. It was cozy, a table set against a window, and a couple of wicker chairs. Against the back wall was a steep set of stairs going up to the upper level. Over near the stove were two simple narrow cots with coarse wool blankets folded neatly beside thin pillows. Matau took a seat at the table and motioned them over. Sitting in front of him was a large sand tray which he tapped. Tier smiled, he’d seen these in other out-laying regions of the empire, a tray about a finger deep that was used to draw out maps. Parchment, paper, those things were for the elite, the rich. Far too expensive for the commoners.

“This is the path up the mountain,” Matau used a gnarled finger to draw in the sand. “It gets steep and winds through trees and by cliffs.”

“And the bandits?” Rale was asking.

“Some say they live in caves near the Vourn road that takes you to Delebeg.” Matau said. “They avoid the Keep itself, but will attack anyone who looks like they’d be carrying anything of value.” He peered at Rale. “The keep is haunted, and they usually avoid it.”

“That’s what you said.” Rale looked doubtful.

“Aye, and it’s true! The spirits are not friendly, not happy.” Matau sniffed. “Most men disbelieve until they’re faced with the vengeful souls of the keep.”

“Some say the ghosts get hungry at night.” Xin added in a dramatic voice, passing by with a couple travel bags. She tossed them into the entryway and wiped her hands. “They say at night, you can hear the screams the murdered souls.”

“Murdered?” Tier asked.

“When Nekar took the Keep.” Matau pinned an unfriendly look at him. “Many innocents died that day.”

“Pshaw, superstition.” Rale snorted. “They probably just heard the wind in their sleep.”

“There are far too many accounts of the ghosts, my lord, for it to be just superstition.” Xin said with a sniff.

“I was taught that Dhaul was the seat of power for the Water Elementals back before the Elemental war.” Tier said. “That was generations ago.”

“True. But their legacy lives on, your highness. In the descendants of the survivors.” Matau stabbed a finger in the direction of the mountain. “They ruled from up there. They say that in the valley and along the coast, there were never floods nor droughts. Always enough rain, not too much, not too little. And they joined the other elementals in battling against the Seeress. That’s why the Nekarian Emperor attacked. The elementals were far too dangerous and conspiring against the Seeress. So they came and wiped out the elementals.” He sniffed. “They’re all gone now, no more elementals. Funny, last year a couple men came from Nekar asking about the fortress and the Elementals.” He peered at them, brows pulling together. “You aren’t looking for any, are you?”

“They’re extinct. You could look your whole life and not find any. Right?” Tier asked sitting back.

“Mostly.” The old man leaned forward, his voice dropping to a conspirators whisper. “But every few generations one will crop up. Oh we find them, eventually. They can never hide for long. When we do, we dispatch them.” He leaned back nodding.

“Dispatch?” Rale frowned. “Kill them, you mean.”

“Nekarian law.” Xin said softly. “No elementals are allowed to live. Surely you of all people are aware of this.”

Rale opened his mouth and closed it again. He looked baffled. Tier almost felt sorry for him.

“Rules are the rules. In fact,” Matau gave a bark of humorless laughter, pointing in Xin’s direction. “Her mother was one.”

Tier looked at her startled. She scowled but met his gaze. The rain hadn’t touched her. Could she be a water elemental?

“They chased her out of town with rocks.” She said blandly. “Swift justice, though they couldn’t catch her.”

“What happened to her?” Tier asked.

“She went into the sea and never came back out.” Matau sniffed again. “They say there are other elementals. That they crop up in the old regions their ancestors were from.”

“Interesting.” Tier tried to feign indifference. Xin was staring at him with narrowed eyes.

“So you are just going to look at the Keep?” She asked.

“Imperial business.” Rale said quickly. “No need to worry.”

“Imperials? On the road with no guards? I’m still finding that hard to understand” She said. “Isn’t it a bit dangerous for imperials, especially the royal household, to travel without a guard?”

“Have you ever heard of the Youskin Charge?” Rale asked, a touch of aggravation in his voice. He pointed at Tier. “He doesn’t need a guard.”

Xin’s eyebrows arched as she looked at him. “Impressive.”

“You don’t seem that impressed.” Rale said petulantly. Tier chuckled, he couldn’t help it.

“Rale,” Tier began.

“Should I be milord?” Xin leaned forward. “Aside from traveling like poor peasants…”

“Xin.” Matau barked.

“Yes Matau?” She asked sweetly, wide eyed. They locked gazes in what Tier guessed was a frequent contest.

Matau glared. “Are the provisions ready?”

“I think so.” She leaned against the counter and addressed them, looking at Tier as she spoke. “It’s a day and a half up the mountain to the Fortress, I could walk it in my sleep. But if you don’t know the way, you’ll never find it. The old roads have been overgrown, the new ones aren’t well traversed in this area, and the bandit issue is very real. They usually stay on the other side of the keep, but they have been known to come closer to the village. I hope you know how to use the swords you wield, you’re going to need them.”

Tier kicked Rale before he could jump on the comment. She was being serious.

“How do you manage?” He asked.

“They’ve never bothered me.” She shrugged.

“They’re still afraid of her mother.” Matau added. Xin rolled her eyes.

“At least they look the part of the seasoned travelers, unlike the last two. Well at least he does.” she nodded towards Tier. She looked at Rale. “He’d be dragon fodder…”

“Xin.” the warning tone from Matau. She flashed a smile at them. “I suggest you get some sleep gentlemen. It’s a steep walk. Goodnight Matau, gentlemen.” She turned and made her way towards the stairs.

Tier watched her and looked back at the sand tray, barely hearing Rale and Matau. When they finished Tier excused himself, to check on the horses and to think.

The rain had stopped, and the clouds thinned. Down the hill the village was quiet and dark. In the distance waves crashed onto an unseen beach. The rising moon cast dark shadows, giving the place an eerie, abandoned air.

Towering above him, a great dark shadow against the velvet sky, was the ancient Fortress of Dhaul, hereditary home of the Water Elementals. Except for the odd phenomena of no water on Xin, nothing he’d seen indicated the presence of any elementals in this region. Not in the other villages they’d passed through, not in this one. Why had the Seeress pointed him in this direction? He rubbed the bridge of his nose.

This was crazy. He’d been taught from childhood that there were no more elementals, he’d never given the rumors he’d heard a second thought. It wasn’t possible, everyone knew that. Yet the Seeress said there were hidden elementals. Hiding and waiting to strike. If there were, why hadn’t his tutors told him about it? They taught what the Seeress taught them. It didn’t make sense, none of it did. If he hadn’t given his word he’d walk away from it. But he had, and it was far different thinking back of the meeting with the Seeress than it was being there.

He was about to go back to the house when he heard a sound. A door opening, perhaps? A figure darted from behind the house and down the narrow pathway towards the bluff. He followed at a distance, silently. It was Xin, and she made her way down the path as one who had done so many times. He hesitated following her as she went towards the beach. A rendezvous perhaps? Secret lover? He shook his head. None of his business. He was about to go back to the house when he felt something, a pressure pressing against his head, a ripple through his mind. Similar to what he’d felt in the Seeress’s presence. He halted, trying to pin point where it came from.

He felt it again, coming from the direction of the beach. He crouched, edging toward the bluff, looking down at the beach. She had dropped the cloak, her long skirt and pale shirt glowing in the moonlight. She reached up and fiddled with her hair, which fell loose. Tier felt the sensation again and for a brief moment it looked like a wave surged upwards towards her, hesitated a heartbeat, then crashed against the sand. Tier scooted closer shaking his head.

“Impossible.” He startled himself saying it aloud. His heart pounded and he half expected her to turn around and see him, though he was certain he hadn’t been heard over the crashing waves. The water did it again. And again, each time accompanied by the pressure in his head. He didn’t know how, but he was certain Xin was controlling the water.

The realization crashed over him. She was a water elemental. His mind went numb. By law he should have her put to death. By the Seeress’s command he needed to convince her to go with him and Rale. He watched her as she lifted her arms over her head again, a large circular blob of water lifted and then floated through the air, matching the movements of her hands. He should be repulsed, put off, angered but instead he watched fascinated. He shook himself, crept back to the house.

He hesitated in the entry, gathering himself, trying to sort his thoughts. When he joined Rale at the table, his cousin frowned at him. Asking him where he’d been. Tier just shook his head, Matau’s unfriendly gaze on them. Their guide was a water elemental, and he had no idea how to convince her to accompany them.

 

~*~

The next chapter will be posted Thursday, June 12th.

If you’re enjoying it, please share, spread the word, I’d appreciate it. Thanks for reading. :)

(c) 2014 Necia Phoenix

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Elemental Truth – Chapter 2

Zander

Originally published at Necia Phoenix. You can comment here or there.

 

Disclaimer;  Elemental Truth, the first of the Elemental Wars books, is in the final stages of editing.  Hope you all enjoy it.*

Chapter 2

 

It took them three weeks traveling along the southern trading route to get to the coast of Lorn. Another three weeks of travel, following the winding north road, brought them to the village of Dhaul. Once guarded over by the Fortress of Dhaul, a center of commerce, it had dwindled to a modest fishing village nestled between the ocean and the towering Dhaulation Mountains. The steep foothills looked, from a distance, blanketed by a sea of soft greens.

The village itself clustered around the old trading route road which switched from paved road to wide dirt path, winding through the southwestern territories of Nekar. In the center of the village was the market. Central hub of activity. Locals spread their wares to sell, hoping to catch the attention of the rare passersby. Tier stopped by a wagon filled with assorted fruits and vegetables, and glanced around. Though the villagers were continuing their usual activities, they were all watching him and Rale closely. Tier sighed. They were supposed to look for elementals here?

“Is that the fortress?” Rale pointed towards the southern granite face that towered over the valley. Tier could make out towers brushing the underside of dark clouds. He turned to the merchant, but the man was already speaking.

“We’ll have rain before nightfall, gracious lords.” He lifted a fruit, offering it to Rale. “Fruit’s the first off the tree, the very best!”

“What is that?” Rale took the fruit.

“Starfruit, only grows in this region.” Tier said absently. “How much?”

“For you, gracious lord, ’tis free.” The man bowed.

“I can’t take your wares without proper payment, good sir.” Tier pulled a coin out. “It’s not fair to you.”

The man’s eyes widened at the sight of the coin. “I will take no payment, gracious lord, but a donation would not be refused.”

“A donation then.” Tier handed him the coin and motioned toward the mountains. “Is there a pathway up to the Keep?”

The merchant frowned, tucking the coin into an inner pouch of his coat. “There is, but the way is dangerous, and overgrown. The imperials stopped patrolling that section of the road. There is a guide, though, he takes in travelers and takes people up the road. He’s never lost anyone.”

“Where would we find him?” Tier glanced around, the curious stares of the nearby villagers was unnerving, they needed to get out of sight before things turned ugly.

“Well, there is a dunurch up the road.” The merchant pointed. “The guide can often be found there. He’s a surly gossip, though.”

“I’ll consider myself warned.” Tier inclined his head as the merchant bowed, and steered Rale back towards the horses.

“A what?” Rale hissed as they walked away.

“A dunurch, it’s something like a restaurant or eating hall.” Tier said, glancing around the seemingly busy road. They had no guards, nothing to hint that they were more than just travelers passing through. The villagers sensed they were different. Eyes followed their every move. Tier untied his horse and motioned Rale to follow.

“They’re nosy.” Rale said.

Tier nodded. “We’ll stop at the dunurch and figure out where to go from here.”

“Do you have any idea what we are looking for?”

Tier shook his head and was several steps in front of Rale before he realized his cousin had halted. He half turned.

“Then what are we supposed to do?”

“We’ll discuss it over dinner.” Tier glanced around. “We’re drawing a crowd out here.”

He ignored Rale’s grumbles behind him. His cousin didn’t grasp the necessity of keeping his head down. He was far too used to the perks of his station. Tier doubted he’d ever traveled without an entourage or guard, except for the trip to the Oracle. In the outlaying provinces of the Empire, unless there was a guard, it wasn’t wise to announce your affiliation with the Imperial household. Resentment still ran deep. Though it had been over four hundred years since the storming of the fortress and the acquisition of Dhaul into the Empire, these people could relate the battle account as though it happened yesterday.

The dunurch was unnamed, probably a meeting place everyone knew about. They tied up their horses and Tier led the way. It was a wide, circular building, round low tables with cushions spaced in a circular pattern. The Dunurch Keeper hurried over, a thin aging man who bowed low, staring at Tier for an uncomfortable moment before his eyes widened and blood drained from his face.

“Your…your highness…”

“Please, no titles. We just need a table and light.”

“This way, most gracious lords.” The man bowed and turned walking stiffly around tables.

The cushions were worn and stained. Tier glanced at Rale’s dubious expression and settled on his.

“They don’t bite Rale.” Tier said. Rale started to say something then shook his head and cringed as he lowered himself to the stained cushion.

“I should have told her no thanks.”

“Do you think she would have taken that answer?” Tier asked. The Dunurch Keeper set a tray with an elaborate silver teapot and several little silver cups.

“The meal is a tasis over grain and steamed vegetables, is this acceptable?” The man was actually wringing his hands together.

“Sounds great.” Rale made a dismissal gesture and leaned forward, squinting at the shiny table top. “It looks clean.”

“Rale.” Tier scowled as the Dunurch Keeper stiffly walked towards the kitchen.

“Tier this place is filthy.”

“Do you want to sleep in the rain?” Tier asked, pulling a map out of his vest.

“No.” Rale said after a long pause. “I don’t want to die of sickness from bad food though.”

Tier poured tea into a small cup and handed it to Rale. “Then be nice to the people who give you food, here. The Empire isn’t exactly trusted in the outer territories.”

“Hmm. What next?”

Tier poured himself some of the tea, sipping it and glancing around the dunurch. They were the only guests, aside from the young woman and an older man sitting in the far corner of the room, speaking low in the local in the local rough dialect. No threat. He unfolded the map and set the tea to one side.

“She sent us here for a reason,” He said, tapping the map.

“Why?” Rale leaned forward, voice hushed. “Our likelihood of returning home alive is not good, Tier. There are no…” He sat back as several plates were deposited in front of them. “There are no more…”

“There were rumors around Jaktor that there were pockets of elementals hiding north of the mountains.” Tier said. “I didn’t give them much thought, until meeting the Seeress.” He finished his tea, folded the map away and motioned to the plates of food. “This doesn’t look half bad.”

They ate quickly and spoke little. Regulars began filing in, lightning lit up the sky, and each time the door opened a rush of cool moist air accompanied the new guests. As the Dunurch Keeper cleared the table Tier watched the young woman and old man in the far corner; both looked uneasy as the tables around theirs filled up.

“Good sir,” Tier lifted his hand, catching the attention of the Dunurch Keeper. “we’re looking for guides up the mountain.” Tier said. The Dunurch Keeper gestured toward the pair in the corner.

“Matau and his granddaughter know the mountain paths to the Keep, and beyond, better than anyone else.” He said. “You’d be wanting lodging too?”

“There’s an inn?” Rale said. The man shook his head.

“Matau.” The Dunurch Keeper waved him over and turned back to them. “He’s a gossip and Xin is a bit strange. But they have taken many up the mountain to the fortress and back safely and they take in lodgers. They’re the only ones who will.”

Tier nodded, watching the pair make their way over. The old man leaned heavily on his cane while the young woman followed behind at a distance. Her blue-gray eyes flickered over Tier and Rale, not quite meeting his gaze, before looking towards the Dunurch Keeper. Her dark hair was pulled back in a bun with two carved wooden hair-sticks in it. Though not very tall, there was something very peculiar about the way she stood, hands gripping the hem of her too-large tunic. She glanced back up, meeting Tier’s gaze then looked away. Oddly shaped blue eyes and the pale skin, Tier was intrigued. She didn’t fit in.

“Tis too late to go up the mountain.” The old man said, his words slurred. He settled on a cushion with a grunt, jabbing at the cushion between him and Tier. “Xin, sit.” She sat, keeping her eyes lowered.

“Shall I bark too, Matau?” She asked, her voice low.

“Hush, girl. The road to the fortress is steep, and dangerous.”

“Howso?” Rale asked.

“Bandits, spirits, wild animals.” Matau shrugged.

“How long do you plan on staying up in the Fortress?” Xin asked.

“A day or two,” Tier shrugged. “Then on to Delebeg.”

The Xin and Matau exchanged a dubious look. “There are outlaws in the forests beyond the fortress. Since there are so few Imperial Patrols in this area, they gather in those mountain passes, robbing those passing through.”

“Tier…” Rale began. Their perspective guides gasped in unison.

“Prince Tier?” Xin asked, staring at him with wide eyes. Tier inclined his head, shooting a dark glare at Rale. He was going to have some strong words with his cousin. She shook her head. “What is an imperial Prince doing in the backwoods sticks of the empire? Without a guard?”

“None of your business, girl.” Rale snapped.

“Personal curiosity.” Tier said. They needed these two, to guide them up the mountain. He’d rather have a guide than fumble through unknown, possibly hostile territory.

Xin’s eyes narrowed. “If we’re going to be guiding both your lordships up the mountain, knowing who we’re dealing with is my business, my lord.” She leaned forward, pinning Rale with an unfriendly stare. “I’m not going to risk my neck if you two are going to put us in danger, I don’t care who you are. Your highness.”

“Xin.” Matau rested his hand on her shoulder, knuckles white. “Go make sure the cots are prepared for our esteemed guests.”

She looked at him, her expression hard. She stood, gave a stiff bow, and left.

“Forgive my granddaughter, she has a sharp tongue.” Matau sighed. “However, she’s right, your lordships. Is the danger worth the coin?”

“Our business will bring neither you nor your people danger, good sir. ‘Tis a personal interest in the fortress that brings us here.” Tier said smoothly.

“It’s a day and a half one way. There is a small cabin on the side of the mountain we stay in overnight. The weather is changeable.”

“Your price?” Rale asked.

Matau named an amount and Rale made a noise that Tier wasn’t sure if he was amused or annoyed. Tier nodded.

“Half now,” Tier set the money on the table. “Half on our arrival at the fortress.”

Matau’s eyes narrowed. He hit the table with a fist. “Done.”

 ~*~

The next chapter will be posted Tues, June 10th.

Thanks for reading. :)

(c) 2014 Necia Phoenix

There might be some formatting adjustments as I figure this out, please bear with me.
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Elemental Truth – Chapter 1

Zander

Originally published at Necia Phoenix. You can comment here or there.

This entry is part 1 of 1 in the series Elemental Truth

Disclaimer;  Okay folks, here it is, Elemental Truth, first of the Elemental Wars stories. It is in the final stages of editing. Hope you all enjoy it.*

She was a beautiful devil, and she held us in the palm of her hand. ~ Emperor Tousan year 20

Chapter 1

Oracle of the Seeress of Nekar; year 1028 of the Empire of Nekar

Tier stared down the steep hill at the cluster of buildings in the valley below, not feeling the heat of the afternoon sun. He fingered the small black scroll, sighing. One didn’t ignore a summons from the Seeress, no matter who he was. He urged his horse on ignoring the chills creeping up his spine.

The Oracle of the Seeress was a complex of buildings, nestled in a narrow valley between snowcapped mountain ranges. Half the complex was dedicated to the local god, whose name escaped him. The other half was the home of the Seeress, last of the Spirit Elementals.

A cold breeze whipped up the path, passed through him. His horse sidestepped, nickering before inching forward. In the courtyard below, priests of the local god had spotted him and waved. He raised his hand in greeting and shook himself. Just a meeting with the Seeress.

The wind grew colder and he felt a heavy pressure building at his temples. It was almost enough to make him halt. With a near audible snap, the pressure was gone, and he again felt the wind, though now it was warm on his cold skin. His horse side-stepped and balked, ears flat on his skull.

“You’ve faced worse than this, old friend.” Tier murmured, patting the warhorse’s neck. “You don’t even have to speak to her, that’s my job.” The horse snorted, pranced in place. “Come on.”

Step by step, he coaxed the horse through the open gates, and once inside it shifted uneasily. The priests who’d been waving at him were nowhere to be seem. Tier frowned as he patted his horse’s neck, looking around. He was reluctant to dismount, taking in his surroundings. Three sides were a covered walkway. A tall, arching doorway gaped at him. It probably lead into the main Oracle. The south wall was a square doorway, with the doors wide open. A stable walkway, horses poked their heads out of their stalls looking in his direction. Beyond the walkway was a corral which he’d seen from up the pass.

The arching doors swung open and several priests came out; their long gray robes looked hot. The bottom hem was frayed and knotted with strands of colorful ribbon. The symbolism was lost on Tier. He was not a religious man. A strong, hot wind kicked up, and their robes billowed and snapped around them. Tier’s horse snorted, sidestepped again and rolled his eyes at the sound.

“Your Highness, we have been waiting for you.” A wrinkled, stooped priest, with a long gray beard, reached up to grip the warhorse’s bridle, rubbing its nose gently. His beard wagged above his toes which peeked out from beneath his robes.

“Where is the messenger we sent?” The priest peered up, squinting. Tier sighed.

“He was killed in a scuffle with bandits along the way.” Tier said, he pulled the small bag of humble belongings from his saddle-pack and handed it to the priest. “I buried him up near the Jaktor border.”

“I see.” The old priest tucked the bag into his robes, sighing. “We will hold a bonfire for him tonight. Thank you, your highness.”

Tier inclined his head. It was the least he could do for the half grown boy. “Do you know what the summons is about?” He asked, dismounting. A younger priest took the reigns and led his horse towards the stable area. The other priests milled about, expressions unreadable.

“I don’t know, your Highness. We obey, we do not question.” The Head Priest said apologetically.

“Figures.” Tier scowled, wiping at his travel dusted breeches. “Don’t tell the peons, eh?”

“Your Highness!” The High Priest scowled at him.

Tier shrugged. “Is there a place to clean up?”

“Tier!”

He turned, recognizing the voice, and grinned. A tall, lean man came through the gate, dropping the reins of his tired looking horse as a priest scrambled over to grab them. Rale Hassof, his younger cousin, strode towards him arms outstretched. He was one of the few noblemen Tier trusted. It had been close to three years since he’d seen him.

“What are you doing here?” Tier asked as they clasped arms. Rale pulled a black scroll from his pocket, wiggling it between his fingers.

“I got a summons. You get one, too? I thought you were up in Jaktor, trying to take the city. His excellency has kept you busy.”

“I was, but the messenger said it was important and it couldn’t wait. General Dyrnos is there, they don’t need me to hold the siege.”

“It is going well, then?”

“We should take the city by winter.”

The High Priest, hands clasped in front of him, cleared his throat, and gestured towards the doorway. “Gentlemen, the Seeress is waiting for you, if you will please follow me.”

Icy fingers clawed up his spine, and the pressure at his temples was back. It increased until it was a steady, throbbing pain in time with his pulse. On the edge of his awareness, he heard a low song, a familiar, haunting tune he couldn’t place. He halted, staring out of the arching gate at the fields beyond. Silver mist crept toward him, covering the ground and the closer it got the louder the song grew.

A ghost mist. Spirits of those who died violently. Tier gritted his teeth. He shouldn’t be able to see them, it was said that only those touched by the spirits were able to see them. He couldn’t look away. Shapes appeared in the mist, hovering several horse-lengths from him. Tiny tendrils of mist crept towards him, hesitant. Faces formed dark gaping eyes and mouths open in a silent scream. The song reached a deafening roar.

“Your highness?” The Priest’s voice cut through the song. Tier jumped, the mist vanished as if it never was. With it the song faded away.

“Are you coming?”

“Yes.” Tier nodded curtly. He took a final long look towards the fields outside the gate, rubbing his palms on his pants, before following the Priest.

 

They were led to a small, torch lit room filled with heady smoke. Blue cord wound around the stone support pillars. In the center of the room was a raised dais, draped with blue cloth. Tier’s gaze was drawn to the slim, pale form in the center of the dais. She was a woman-child, draped in thin gauze-like white strips of cloth. She lay on her back, arms and legs sprawled out, hands twitching. Her hair, thick silver curls, moved as though it had a mind of its own. The chills were back. This was the ages old Seeress?

“He is here, holy one.” The priest bowed low, turned and hurried back up the hallway.

She turned her head, looking towards him. Tier took a step backwards. Her eyes were white. No color, no pupil. A dead, emotionless gaze staring at him.

“I’ve been waiting for you.” She whispered. “I need your help, you must find the elementals.”

Tier couldn’t tear his eyes away from her, both repulsed and fascinated. The air stilled, the chamber silent. Somewhere Tier heard water dripped. The Seeress moved in exaggerated, fluid movements, somehow in time with the water. She stood, diminutive; the sheer fabric strips did nothing to hide her lush, young figure, nor her pasty-pale skin. Her movements were stiff, first fast, then slow, her hair and clothes floated around her as though she were underwater. Tier’s heart was pounding painfully in his chest, the hair on the back of his neck was on end.

“My lady, the Elementals nearly destroyed the world.” The priest said from the doorway, his voice admonishing her like a father would a daughter. She didn’t glance his way.

Tier shot a look at Rale. His cousin’s eyes were wide, his face pale.

“The world is out of balance and we need the elementals to fix it.” Her voice was soft, sultry, almost too low to hear. The Seeress turned her head towards them. “If they can’t be found, and brought here, there will be disaster.” She lifted one slender hand, pointing in Tier’s direction. “Find them. There isn’t much time.”

Tier heard a rush of air moving through the chamber, darkness closed in around him. His head throbbed; a chill crept up his back. He stood in a circle of light, unable to see the rest of the chamber.

“What?” His own voice startled him. He heard nothing else, not even the dripping water. He strained to listen. There, a whisper of movement, a rustling of fabric, soft breathing at his ear.

“The world was plunged into darkness, my prince.” The Seeress’ whispered. He cringed, his skin was trying to crawl away on its own. Her voice conjured up images of silk and satin, and his stomach churned dangerously. “Some of the Sprit Elementals survived. We warned the great kings what would happen, but they wouldn’t listen. It was the others, the shapers, who did the damage.”

“I thought the shaping elementals were all extinct.” He forced the words out.

“There are a few who survived. They’re hidden in the shadows, waiting to destroy what I have worked so hard to rebuild.”

“Why?”

“They want what I have.” Her voice went brittle. “Power. If you bring them here, they can be forced to fix what they’ve destroyed. And heal the damage to the land.” She sighed against his ear. “You’ve seen it yourself, during your travels.”

He felt cool hands on his forearm and tried not to flinch away. Her voice dropped and he could almost feel her thin form pressing against him.

“If we are to save our world, we must find them.”

Tier felt the darkness closing in on him, wrapping around him. A cloak of shadow, blocking everything but her voice.

“Do not forget, my prince. If you do, we all will suffer and perish.”

He felt as though he was falling. Images, confusing and violent, flashed through his mind. Her voice echoed in his ears.
“Another war is coming and if the elementals are not found, it will tear our world apart.”

He opened his eyes trying to remember when he’d closed them. The Seeress stood in front of him, expression as blank as her eyes. His head pounded.

“You will go and find one water user, one fire wielder, one air dancer and one rock shaper.” Her voice was cool. She circled him, he felt like a mouse and she was a great cat ready to pounce.

“That is impossible, with all due respect, Holy One, they’re extinct. All gone.” Rale protested.

“Where would I go to find them?” Tier asked. She trailed a finger across his back and as she circled back in front of him, across his chest stabbing at him with an overlong fingernail.

“You start south, near the Fortress of Dhaul.” She trailed her fingernail downwards. Tier clenched his fist, slapping her hand away wouldn’t be received well. One didn’t slap away the Seeress if one wanted to live to old age. She looked back at him and dropped her hand. “You will return them to me. Do I have your word on it, dear prince?”

He hesitated; so many things could go wrong. “What if I don’t find any? What if they refuse to come with me?”

“Do your best, if they refuse to join you, return to me. We’ll reconsider our options.” Her head tipped to one side. “Can you do that, your highness?”

He stiffened, the insult loud in his ears. “You have my word of honor.” He forced the words out. There was an odd ring to them, like the closing of a lid. The Seeress smiled and turned towards Rale.

“You go, account for everything you see.”

“What?” Rale blinked, looking back and forth between Tier and the Seeress.

“You are my witness. Can I hold you to that, Lord Rale?”

Tier felt his cheeks burning. He gritted his teeth and met Rale’s startled eyes over the top of her head and gave a sharp nod.

“You have my word.” Rale choked out. The Seeress inclined her head, turned, and walked with the slow, stop start motion, back to the dais.
The priest stepped between the Seeress and Tier, handing him a newly sealed black scroll, before bowing and leaving again up the passage. From the shadows came several pale, female attendants, helping the Seeress back onto the dais.

“What is this?” Tier held it up.

“Your orders.” She looked over her shoulder at him. “Just in case you forget what they are. Till we meet again, your highness.”

 

Seeress

 

 

Next chapter will be posted Thursday, June 5th.

(c) 2014 Necia Phoenix

*There might be some formatting adjustments as I figure this out, please bear with me.
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Thoughts on Death, Dying, and Grief

Zander

Originally published at Necia Phoenix. You can comment here or there.

There are many lines of thinking when it comes to what happens after our bodies give up and what is us, our soul, drifts away into the who knows. The topic is a hot one, wars have been waged, many have been killed over whose idea of the afterlife is the ‘right’ one. But this really isn’t about what happens to us after WE go, rather the emotional distress on those who have to move on without us.

It is all right to cry and grieve. It’s normal. It really is.

Yesterday we lost a great. Author Jay Lake passed away after a long fight with cancer. You can read about his battle at his blog, follow the Cancer tag and settle in for some deep reading.

I had this whole long thing planned out and it just sorta piddled away. He inspired me and though I never got an opportunity to meet him; he taught me. He made me very aware of health issues and of not brushing off things.

I’ll miss reading his blog, I’ll miss seeing the pictures of him from Cons. I hadn’t been online much yesterday, at least not at social media sites,  and when I went to my fb early early this morning I saw my feed blowing up with pictures, RIP posts.

I hurt for his partner and his daughter and the rest of his family and network of dear friends, coworkers and colleagues. I’m sitting here weepy because I can just imagine how hard it must be for them to suddenly NOT have him there. And that’s the thing, I think, about dying. He’s out of pain, finally, the people who go, they’re gone, on to the next great adventure or whatever it is they believe, but for those who are left behind, they have to continue on and try to work around the sudden huge hole that appeared in their life. I don’t think, even though we knew it was coming, that one can ever really be prepared for someone passing on.

So R.I.P. Jay, and thank you for sharing your journey with the world.

jaylake

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It’s time

Zander

Originally published at Necia Phoenix. You can comment here or there.

So I’ve been waffling on this for a while now, but I’m taking a jump here. Starting next Tuesday here and, possibly Wattpad, Elemental Truth will be posted as a serial. Two chapters a week, Tuesdays and Thursdays until it’s done. Once it’s wrapped up, I’ll do a final edit pass then it’ll be available as an ebook & a POD through either Createspace or Lulu (I’m still looking into the details on that). This is an experiment, I’m not sure if I’ll serialize the other Elemental books,we’ll see how things go. One step at a time, right?

 

Ok, off to do a final edit sweep and try not to dissolve into a pile of twitching nerves.

 

 

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Zander snip

Zander

Originally published at Necia Phoenix. You can comment here or there.

So in an effort to beat back a case of melancholy I wrote this for Z1, enjoy;

 

“More patrols. You know, when the horn sounded I thought we’d be under siege. The Zarconis haven’t even peeked out of the forest yet!” Kerul complained.

Zander glanced towards the smoking ruin of the forest. There were places that still smoldered, the smell permeated everything. They moved along the road that led beside the river, watching the other side. The silence was heavy, like something was waiting.

Zander shivered, tightening his cloak and stumbled over something stuck in the ground. He swore under his breath, gripping the oblong stick and yanked hard.

A loud crackling sound filled the air and across the river something flickered, then faded. Zander ducked behind one of the scraggly bushes and stared. Flickering in and out of sight was what appeared to be zarconis, constructing a rough wooden bridge.

“What in the hell?” Kerul hissed.

“Where did they come from?” Nadja hissed in Zander’s ear. She took the oblong stick from Zander’s hand turning it this way and that. The zarconis and the bridge they were building flashed in and out of view. Hayner reached over and grabbed the stick from her hand.

“You found this?” He asked, looking down at Zander.

“Tripped over it. What is it?”

Hayner turned it one way. The bridge and zarconis appeared. The zarconis seemed unaware of being seen. Hayner turned it the other way and they vanished. They looked at each other.

“A shield stick?” Bastien asked.

“There’s another one on the other side of the river I’d bet.” Valen said, frowning.

“They don’t seem to realize we can see them.” Bastien grinned.

“We should send a report back,” Hayner began.

“Now wait one damn minuet.” Nadja said, gripping his hand. “How long would it take? A couple of days? Then the city would dispatch a team and it would take time. The bridge might be done by the time another better equipped team showed up.” She took the stick and wiggled it back and forth.

“Nadja, last time we did something without orders,” Hayner pointed to the smoldering east bank. “They say there could be patches that will burn for years!”

“What would it take to bring that thing down? A well placed charge or two? Boom and it’s gone.” Kerul said quickly. “There’s really no more forest to burn down.”

“On that side.” Bastien quipped.

“And it’ll send a signal back to the city that there’s something going on, and we could continue upriver to see if there are any other hidden surprises.”

Hayner rubbed his face. “I shouldn’t be agreeing to this.”

 

 

Have a good Wednesday.

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Some not so good news

Zander

Originally published at Necia Phoenix. You can comment here or there.

I was just informed that because we didn’t get Connie’s payment in, her place was given away. **sigh** Now connie does have the People to People opportunity next year, but the STEM opportunity (for this summer at least) is not happening. Thank you all for your donations and assistance, your refunds will be applied here in the next few min.

Thanks anyways guys, I appreciate the thoughts and the help.

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Need a bit of help.

Zander

Originally published at Necia Phoenix. You can comment here or there.

My daughter got this great opportunity to attend National Youth Leadership Forum: Explore STEM;

About NYLF Explore STEM

The National Youth Leadership Forum (NYLF): Explore STEM is a six-day Envision program that introduces high-achieving middle school students to innovative and rewarding academic experiences and careers in science, engineering, medicine and technology.

Cutting-edge STEM fields – based on science, technology, engineering and mathematics – are the fastest growing areas of study and STEM professionals are in high demand in the United States and throughout the world.

When you attend NYLF Explore STEM, you will discover your passions through hands-on experiences that will put you on the path to success in high school, in college and in life. You will learn how to apply your science and math skills to join the next generation of leading doctors, scientists, software developers and other analytically minded professionals.

We’re immensely proud of her and I’ve enrolled her in it. However, due to unforseen events, we’re still struggling to scrape the funds together and the deadline is fast approaching. We need about $1000 more to get her there.

Please, if you can help her out. this is a once in a lifetime opportunity. If you can’t give, could you please boost the signal? I don’t know what else to do.


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Another Dmitri Scene

Zander

Originally published at Necia Phoenix. You can comment here or there.

So I haven’t been very creative lately, so last night I scribbled up some back history scenes with Dmitri, so here, have a dragon snip!

~*~

Lothos sat, in his human form, on the large throne, watching the goings on. His people. He sneered. They cast uneasy glimpses his way, aware that he was watching. The sound of the storm intensified and he frowned, leaning forward. Something had entered the long entry tunnel. Other dragons near the entry tunnel scooted away, a hush fell over the hall and those near the entry tunnel scooted away, creating a path to the dais.

Lothos felt the growl boiling up as the large gray dragon moved into the hall. He stood swallowing a sudden surge of fear. The gray shifted to a tall human in blue who stopped a few feet away, eyes locked with his. Scars, some Lothos had given him, some others had, crossed his cheeks. Lothos narrowed his eyes.

“You have a lot of nerve coming into my hall, Dmitri.” Lothos growled. Dmitri, his son, regarded him. Cool, expressionless. A mask that locked whatever the man was thinking, behind it. Once it had driven Lothos to the point of mindless rage, enough to try anything, everything he could think of, to try to break that exterior, to crack the mask. Now, as he studied his son, he felt a bit of pride, and a lot of fear. You can’t read a man with no expression, and a man you couldn’t read could kill you when you least expect it. He had no doubt that someday, Dmitri would try to kill him.

“We need to talk.” Dmitri’s voice was low, but the hush in the hall made it carry.

Lothos eyed him and glanced towards Otto. His second shrugged. Lothos motioned the office doors. He rarely used it, he hated planning. Dmitri turned and strode towards them, not looking at the silent dragons who scrambled to get out of his way. Did he have any idea how many of Lothos own people feared him? Lothos shook his head, nodded at Otto and followed his estranged son into the dusty office.
He hesitated before closing the doors, but did. Dmitri wouldn’t attack him, he was certain of that.

“You’ve muscled back into the lower packs. Impressive.” Lothos said, as soon as the doors closed. He turned and met Dmitri’s cold gaze. “Why you’re here, though…”

“You have a gap in your south east region.” Dmitri said, he moved towards the map, looking up at the sprawling lines. Lothos frowned.

“There’s little there.” He shrugged.

“There’s the Northern boundaries.” Dmitri turned to him, his eyes piercing. “There is nothing to stop the Dragonmaster’s people from moving north.”

Lothos rumbled looking up at the map. He nodded slowly. “Your flight is small, think you can handle it?”

Dmitri looked at him. Lothos swallowed, felt tingles moving up his spine. “We’d need a base of operation.” He said after a long silence. He pointed. “Give me the Keep. And your South Eastern borders will be secured.”

Lothos stared at him, sensing a power play, not sure what it was. “You want the Keep.”

“Yes.”

“Why?”

Dmitri smiled coldly but said nothing. Lothos narrowed his eyes.

“Kepplings took it over years ago.”

“I know.”

“You clear it, it’s yours.”

 

~*~

:D

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Fundraiser [edited to add donation button]

Zander

Originally published at Necia Phoenix. You can comment here or there.

I don’t usually go over family stuffs here but this is important. My daughter got recommended by one of her teachers to attend the National Youth Leadership Forum; S.T.E.M. From the website;

The National Youth Leadership Forum (NYLF): Explore STEM is a six-day Envision program that introduces high-achieving middle school students to innovative and rewarding academic experiences and careers in science, engineering, medicine and technology.

She has attended several Science and Math geared day courses and this has just blown us away. I do have a bit of a dilemma, the cost involved. It’s not cheap.

I put together a fundraiser over here to put together the $$ to cover her tuition. If you could spread the word, I’d appreciate it.

 

Edited to add;

For those who would rather just donate straight to the cause and bypass buying anything here’s a donate button;



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Fundraiser

Zander

Originally published at Necia Phoenix. You can comment here or there.

I don’t usually go over family stuffs here but this is important. My daughter got recommended by one of her teachers to attend the National Youth Leadership Forum; S.T.E.M. From the website;

The National Youth Leadership Forum (NYLF): Explore STEM is a six-day Envision program that introduces high-achieving middle school students to innovative and rewarding academic experiences and careers in science, engineering, medicine and technology.

She has attended several Science and Math geared day courses and this has just blown us away. I do have a bit of a dilemma, the cost involved. It’s not cheap.

I put together a fundraiser over here to put together the $$ to cover her tuition. If you could spread the word, I’d appreciate it.

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Planning

Zander

Originally published at Necia Phoenix. You can comment here or there.

J.A. Marlow gave me this project planner back in Jan, but I kinda forgot all about it. Sat night I dusted it off and started planning out projects, setting dates and OCDing on what I want to get done this year. I may have overloaded myself :P but I have a clear cut idea of what I want to get done over the next…two years 0.0.

You read that right, two years.  Just take a look at my Series List and you’ll see I have more than enough planned stories to write XD (Yes J.A. Marlow, this is ALL YOUR FAULT!!!  **shakes fist**)  :P

The rest of this year needs to be an Avaria year, and next will be the dragons. I’ve also got smaller projects that I want to put out in between the larger ones. I need to get this ball rolling. I’ve pushed The Bastard Prince back to September at the latest. I have the project The Fallen staring patiently at me waiting for me to finish the edits and put it up for sale. The plan is to do that for this May.

I also have some digi art plans, and plans to do a really awesome computer build (think alienware, but homemade, it is going to fucking ROCK!) so there’s a lot to think about, aside from the family shtuff. I am still around, have just been drowning in life stuff.

Hope yall have a great Monday!

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Just an update

Zander

Originally published at Necia Phoenix. You can comment here or there.

Life kinda got topsyturvy lately and that has negatively affected my writing, blogging and social media.I am still learning how to plow through it all. I’ve pushed Zander’s release date back to June or July and have to sit down and rethink a lot of my writing goals. There have been a few life changes and I need to adjust when I plan on putting things out.

I’ll update with those changes when I finalize them.

N

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Old story revisited

Zander

Originally published at Necia Phoenix. You can comment here or there.

For some reason I started thinking about this old Avaria story which disappeared on a lost hard drive years ago. I decided to try to re-write the intro (I don’t remember how much of it I had actually written) and I have to say, rough as it is, I like this version. Have some slightly raw words;

(quick note, this story will actually pick up right where the prior story, The Darkening Marsh, left off.)

~*~

Time was suspended. Somewhere in the distance something dripped. A slow and steady sound, something to listen to besides ones own heartbeat. Zindith drifted in and out of consciousness, on waves of pain reminding him he was still alive. His heartbeat pounded in his ears, his breathing harsh. Whispers echoed in the dark caverns, memories of voices long since silenced. He heard a groan, realized belatedly that it was his own. He opened his eyes, fighting to stay awake. Darkness closed in around him, and he noticed a faint glow nearby. He frowned and turned to look closer at the glow. Pain shot through his body, a throbbing burning settled along the left side of his face and torso.

Memories rushed at him, who he was and how he’d gotten there, he groaned again. Trapped between enemies, he’d acted, tackling the Slayer, knocking them both over the edge of the ravine. How far had he fallen? The Slayer vanished, opening a rift and sliding into another realm leaving him plummeting towards the river below.

Zindith remembered hitting the cold water, the shock of it sent waves of pain through him. Then nothing. He rolled over, gasping for breath and fighting a churning stomach. Sand, he was on sand. He pushed himself up, peering around. He didn’t remember anything beyond hitting the water. He was far underground, deep in the Labyrinth, but where? How long had he been in the river? He didn’t know. He glanced back at the glowing. Thin ropes of pale green glowing things hung from above. The light they provided was faint, almost useless.

He ran a hand through his hair, inhaling deeply. Musty, moldy, with the faint metallic scent that permeated everything in the Shadowlands. He coughed and groaned. His sides hurt, bruised ribs? Cracked? He hoped nothing was broken. There were no healers in this place.

“Thank the gods for being half telaxian.” He murmured. His voice was loud in the cave, echoing and joining the faint whispers in the distance.

He closed his eyes fighting a wave of dizzy, and heard the singing. A woman’s voice, echoing through the tunnels, singing a song in a language he’d never heard. The tone was haunting, full of loss and deep longing. It tugged at him. He pushed himself to his feet, swaying a bit. He was tough. Like his brothers and sister. Like his father. A little fall wasn’t going to stop him. He gritted his teeth, his stomach doing dangerous flops. What little he’d eaten before needed to stay where it was. He had no rations, no idea of what was edible in this place. He couldn’t afford to lose his lunch. Then the song changed in pitch, lower, angry. He listened, focusing completely on it, willing his body to obey. Now was not the time to be ill. He wanted to find the singer. No, he needed to find her, though why he wasn’t sure.

He quickly took stock. His pack was gone, lost in the river no doubt. With it were the torches and the healing salve for his burns. His belt pouch, though soaked, was still firmly secured on his wide belt. He unfastened it and opened it, swearing.

He put his hand over the top and flipped it upside down, letting the water pour out. Everything in there, the herb packets, the small parchment for writing notes, all ruined. He let them drop to the sandy ground, keeping ahold of the small light orb his brother, Auron, had given him. He hoped it still worked. The glowing ropes didn’t provide enough light to see. He wiped it on his tunic, and tapped it as he’d been taught. It flared to life, sending rays of light dancing over the cave walls. He finally got a good glimpse of where he was and his stomach did another dangerous flop.

He stood on a narrow sandy beach beside the river that coiled away, disappearing into the darkness. How far from the bridge and ledge was he? He shuddered, afraid to know. He looked upriver, trying to get an idea for where he was. There wasn’t a riverbank except the strip of beach he was on. The river had carved a tunnel through the rock, sheer cliffs on either side made going back the way he came impossible. He wasn’t about to try to risk walking in the river itself. Who knew what might be lurking beneath the surface? He edged toward the sloping walls, ducking under the ropey-glowing moss. It glowed brighter the closer he got, reflecting the light of the orb. He frowned, peering at the walls. Deep in his mind he felt a tug, faint, but persistent. He moved closer, lifting the orb, hoping to get a better glimpse. There was a jagged tear in the rock, a passage leading up and away from the river. He leaned against the edge of the entry letting another wave of dizzy pass. He needed to get out, to find the singer. He dared not guess what sort of creepy crawlies were in the passage.

The tug in his mind was insistent. He needed to go into the passage. He nodded. So far it hadn’t led him wrong. It guided him to where the Slayer had hidden Mayhren, it had guided them back to the surface before the fireball. He swallowed, aware of the tightness in his left cheek, the pain that he was getting used to. He glanced back towards the river and took a deep breath, wincing at the pain in his sides, and stepped into the looming darkness.

It pressed against the orb light, closing around him, blocking off all view and any hope of escape. It felt alive in some way, a malevolent presence that wasn’t willing to let him leave. He forced one foot in front of the other, trying to think of anything other than the dark. His companions, his brother, they probably thought he’d died in the fall. He’d find a way back to the surface and back to Avaria. He’d get beyond the reach of this darkness and find a way to let them know he wasn’t dead.

The passage wound its way upward, in some spots he had to tuck the orb in his tunic and climb steep slopes. With each step the tug got stronger, a pressure in his head that was almost painful.

The passage ended at a stone carved doorway though the door itself had long since rotted away. Zindith stared, disbelief and awe blocking out the pain. How long had it stood silent in the dark, waiting for its masters to return? The tug pulsed, pain shot through his head. He gasped for breath, and edged closer to the doorway. He stepped through the doorway, wishing he had a weapon. Who knew what might be in this place? Stepping away from the door, the light of the orb illuminated an ages old walkway carved into the sides of immense cliffs. Guardrails once stood along the far edge, but most of those had long worn away. All that were left were posts that would have held the railings. Overhead he could see the orb’s light glinting off of what might have been metal chandeliers or some sort of lighting devices.

“Impossible.” He murmured, his voice bouncing off the walls. In the distance, to his left, a stone bridge spanned the chasm, the far end concealed in the blanket of darkness. The tug pulled him in that direction. Bemused and in awe he went where it led, noting the archways that dotted the sides of the chasm, and the passageway. Who had carved these ways? He couldn’t wrap his mind around it. The rahaun hadn’t lived underground. He didn’t recall any other legends that hinted that these passages existed. His heart pounded and the tug became a pounding at his temples. It stopped, as suddenly as it started, when he reached the bridge.

He stared up at the steps leading across the chasm, his heart loud in his ears. The steps led to a wide flat platform, then a walkway arched back downward to a second platform from which another set of stairs led, he hoped, to the other side. He couldn’t tell. The orb’s light cut off, unable to penetrate the wall of dark ahead of him.

He took another look around. The archways, with their passages gaping at him, gave him the shakes. He could almost imagine things just on the other side of the dark, watching him, waiting to strike when the orb flickered out. He shook it off, looked back at the stone bridge. He felt it, briefly. The tug, gently pulling him towards the bridge. He stepped onto the stone bridge, testing it. Who knew how long this had stood, alone, in the dark underground of the Shadowlands. It felt firm.

He  went up the steps, wishing there was a rail of some sort. When he reached the first platform he got a glimpse of the other side and smiled. Another passage, but it veered upward towards steps coiling towards the distant ceiling. His ticket out, perhaps? He hesitated, glancing back the way he’d come, listening. His own breathing was loud in the hush. No echos, no drips, no bodiless voices lamenting in a dead language. Silent. The caverns were holding their breath, the darkness waiting for a misstep. He shook himself. Too many knocks to the head.

Zindith wiped his hand on his breeches. He felt clammy, ill, and dizzy. He hurried across the wide arch toward the second platform. He felt the tremble through his boots, and swore. A cracking sound echoed off the walls of the chasm. He swore darting towards the platform as he felt the bridge beneath his feet crumbling. He jumped, landing on his stomach on the platform the air knocked from his lungs as the arch crumbled, clattering far below. He barely caught his breath, starting to pull himself up when the platform shuddered. He swore, the crack of shattering rock deafening. The platform dropped out from beneath him and he was falling again. He closed his eyes, there was no river below to save him. The fall halted and pain exploded across his jaw and nose as he hit the stone face first. Darkness wrapped around him.

 ~*~

 Part 2

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Old story revisited

Zander

Originally published at Necia Phoenix. You can comment here or there.

For some reason I started thinking about this old Avaria story which disappeared on a lost hard drive years ago. I decided to try to re-write the intro (I don’t remember how much of it I had actually written) and I have to say, rough as it is, I like this version. Have some slightly raw words;

(quick note, this story will actually pick up right where the prior story, The Darkening Marsh, left off.)

~*~

Time was suspended. Somewhere in the distance something dripped. A slow and steady sound, something to listen to besides ones own heartbeat. Zindith drifted in and out of consciousness, on waves of pain reminding him he was still alive. His heartbeat pounded in his ears, his breathing harsh. Whispers echoed in the dark caverns, memories of voices long since silenced. He heard a groan, realized belatedly that it was his own. He opened his eyes, fighting to stay awake. Darkness closed in around him, and he noticed a faint glow nearby. He frowned and turned to look closer at the glow. Pain shot through his body, a throbbing burning settled along the left side of his face and torso.

Memories rushed at him, who he was and how he’d gotten there, he groaned again. Trapped between enemies, he’d acted, tackling the Slayer, knocking them both over the edge of the ravine. How far had he fallen? The Slayer vanished, opening a rift and sliding into another realm leaving him plummeting towards the river below.

Zindith remembered hitting the cold water, the shock of it sent waves of pain through him. Then nothing. He rolled over, gasping for breath and fighting a churning stomach. Sand, he was on sand. He pushed himself up, peering around. He didn’t remember anything beyond hitting the water. He was far underground, deep in the Labyrinth, but where? How long had he been in the river? He didn’t know. He glanced back at the glowing. Thin ropes of pale green glowing things hung from above. The light they provided was faint, almost useless.

He ran a hand through his hair, inhaling deeply. Musty, moldy, with the faint metallic scent that permeated everything in the Shadowlands. He coughed and groaned. His sides hurt, bruised ribs? Cracked? He hoped nothing was broken. There were no healers in this place.

“Thank the gods for being half telaxian.” He murmured. His voice was loud in the cave, echoing and joining the faint whispers in the distance.

He closed his eyes fighting a wave of dizzy, and heard the singing. A woman’s voice, echoing through the tunnels, singing a song in a language he’d never heard. The tone was haunting, full of loss and deep longing. It tugged at him. He pushed himself to his feet, swaying a bit. He was tough. Like his brothers and sister. Like his father. A little fall wasn’t going to stop him. He gritted his teeth, his stomach doing dangerous flops. What little he’d eaten before needed to stay where it was. He had no rations, no idea of what was edible in this place. He couldn’t afford to lose his lunch. Then the song changed in pitch, lower, angry. He listened, focusing completely on it, willing his body to obey. Now was not the time to be ill. He wanted to find the singer. No, he needed to find her, though why he wasn’t sure.

He quickly took stock. His pack was gone, lost in the river no doubt. With it were the torches and the healing salve for his burns. His belt pouch, though soaked, was still firmly secured on his wide belt. He unfastened it and opened it, swearing.

He put his hand over the top and flipped it upside down, letting the water pour out. Everything in there, the herb packets, the small parchment for writing notes, all ruined. He let them drop to the sandy ground, keeping ahold of the small light orb his brother, Auron, had given him. He hoped it still worked. The glowing ropes didn’t provide enough light to see. He wiped it on his tunic, and tapped it as he’d been taught. It flared to life, sending rays of light dancing over the cave walls. He finally got a good glimpse of where he was and his stomach did another dangerous flop.

He stood on a narrow sandy beach beside the river that coiled away, disappearing into the darkness. How far from the bridge and ledge was he? He shuddered, afraid to know. He looked upriver, trying to get an idea for where he was. There wasn’t a riverbank except the strip of beach he was on. The river had carved a tunnel through the rock, sheer cliffs on either side made going back the way he came impossible. He wasn’t about to try to risk walking in the river itself. Who knew what might be lurking beneath the surface? He edged toward the sloping walls, ducking under the ropey-glowing moss. It glowed brighter the closer he got, reflecting the light of the orb. He frowned, peering at the walls. Deep in his mind he felt a tug, faint, but persistent. He moved closer, lifting the orb, hoping to get a better glimpse. There was a jagged tear in the rock, a passage leading up and away from the river. He leaned against the edge of the entry letting another wave of dizzy pass. He needed to get out, to find the singer. He dared not guess what sort of creepy crawlies were in the passage.

The tug in his mind was insistent. He needed to go into the passage. He nodded. So far it hadn’t led him wrong. It guided him to where the Slayer had hidden Mayhren, it had guided them back to the surface before the fireball. He swallowed, aware of the tightness in his left cheek, the pain that he was getting used to. He glanced back towards the river and took a deep breath, wincing at the pain in his sides, and stepped into the looming darkness.

It pressed against the orb light, closing around him, blocking off all view and any hope of escape. It felt alive in some way, a malevolent presence that wasn’t willing to let him leave. He forced one foot in front of the other, trying to think of anything other than the dark. His companions, his brother, they probably thought he’d died in the fall. He’d find a way back to the surface and back to Avaria. He’d get beyond the reach of this darkness and find a way to let them know he wasn’t dead.

The passage wound its way upward, in some spots he had to tuck the orb in his tunic and climb steep slopes. With each step the tug got stronger, a pressure in his head that was almost painful.

The passage ended at a stone carved doorway though the door itself had long since rotted away. Zindith stared, disbelief and awe blocking out the pain. How long had it stood silent in the dark, waiting for its masters to return? The tug pulsed, pain shot through his head. He gasped for breath, and edged closer to the doorway. He stepped through the doorway, wishing he had a weapon. Who knew what might be in this place? Stepping away from the door, the light of the orb illuminated an ages old walkway carved into the sides of immense cliffs. Guardrails once stood along the far edge, but most of those had long worn away. All that were left were posts that would have held the railings. Overhead he could see the orb’s light glinting off of what might have been metal chandeliers or some sort of lighting devices.

“Impossible.” He murmured, his voice bouncing off the walls. In the distance, to his left, a stone bridge spanned the chasm, the far end concealed in the blanket of darkness. The tug pulled him in that direction. Bemused and in awe he went where it led, noting the archways that dotted the sides of the chasm, and the passageway. Who had carved these ways? He couldn’t wrap his mind around it. The rahaun hadn’t lived underground. He didn’t recall any other legends that hinted that these passages existed. His heart pounded and the tug became a pounding at his temples. It stopped, as suddenly as it started, when he reached the bridge.

He stared up at the steps leading across the chasm, his heart loud in his ears. The steps led to a wide flat platform, then a walkway arched back downward to a second platform from which another set of stairs led, he hoped, to the other side. He couldn’t tell. The orb’s light cut off, unable to penetrate the wall of dark ahead of him.

He took another look around. The archways, with their passages gaping at him, gave him the shakes. He could almost imagine things just on the other side of the dark, watching him, waiting to strike when the orb flickered out. He shook it off, looked back at the stone bridge. He felt it, briefly. The tug, gently pulling him towards the bridge. He stepped onto the stone bridge, testing it. Who knew how long this had stood, alone, in the dark underground of the Shadowlands. It felt firm.

He  went up the steps, wishing there was a rail of some sort. When he reached the first platform he got a glimpse of the other side and smiled. Another passage, but it veered upward towards steps coiling towards the distant ceiling. His ticket out, perhaps? He hesitated, glancing back the way he’d come, listening. His own breathing was loud in the hush. No echos, no drips, no bodiless voices lamenting in a dead language. Silent. The caverns were holding their breath, the darkness waiting for a misstep. He shook himself. Too many knocks to the head.

Zindith wiped his hand on his breeches. He felt clammy, ill, and dizzy. He hurried across the wide arch toward the second platform. He felt the tremble through his boots, and swore. A cracking sound echoed off the walls of the chasm. He swore darting towards the platform as he felt the bridge beneath his feet crumbling. He jumped, landing on his stomach on the platform the air knocked from his lungs as the arch crumbled, clattering far below. He barely caught his breath, starting to pull himself up when the platform shuddered. He swore, the crack of shattering rock deafening. The platform dropped out from beneath him and he was falling again. He closed his eyes, there was no river below to save him. The fall halted and pain exploded across his jaw and nose as he hit the stone face first. Darkness wrapped around him.

 ~*~

 

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Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter

Old story revisited

Zander

Originally published at Necia Phoenix. You can comment here or there.

For some reason I started thinking about this old Avaria story which disappeared on a lost hard drive years ago. I decided to try to re-write the intro (I don’t remember how much of it I had actually written) and I have to say, rough as it is, I like this version. Have some slightly raw words;

(quick note, this story will actually pick up right where the prior story, The Darkening Marsh, left off.)

~*~

Time was suspended. Somewhere in the distance something dripped. A slow and steady sound, something to listen to besides ones own heartbeat. Zindith drifted in and out of consciousness, on waves of pain reminding him he was still alive. His heartbeat pounded in his ears, his breathing harsh. Whispers echoed in the dark caverns, memories of voices long since silenced. He heard a groan, realized belatedly that it was his own. He opened his eyes, fighting to stay awake. Darkness closed in around him, and he noticed a faint glow nearby. He frowned and turned to look closer at the glow. Pain shot through his body, a throbbing burning settled along the left side of his face and torso.

Memories rushed at him, who he was and how he’d gotten there, he groaned again. Trapped between enemies, he’d acted, tackling the Slayer, knocking them both over the edge of the ravine. How far had he fallen? The Slayer vanished, opening a rift and sliding into another realm leaving him plummeting towards the river below.

Zindith remembered hitting the cold water, the shock of it sent waves of pain through him. Then nothing. He rolled over, gasping for breath and fighting a churning stomach. Sand, he was on sand. He pushed himself up, peering around. He didn’t remember anything beyond hitting the water. He was far underground, deep in the Labyrinth, but where? How long had he been in the river? He didn’t know. He glanced back at the glowing. Thin ropes of pale green glowing things hung from above. The light they provided was faint, almost useless.

He ran a hand through his hair, inhaling deeply. Musty, moldy, with the faint metallic scent that permeated everything in the Shadowlands. He coughed and groaned. His sides hurt, bruised ribs? Cracked? He hoped nothing was broken. There were no healers in this place.

“Thank the gods for being half telaxian.” He murmured. His voice was loud in the cave, echoing and joining the faint whispers in the distance.

He closed his eyes fighting a wave of dizzy, and heard the singing. A woman’s voice, echoing through the tunnels, singing a song in a language he’d never heard. The tone was haunting, full of loss and deep longing. It tugged at him. He pushed himself to his feet, swaying a bit. He was tough. Like his brothers and sister. Like his father. A little fall wasn’t going to stop him. He gritted his teeth, his stomach doing dangerous flops. What little he’d eaten before needed to stay where it was. He had no rations, no idea of what was edible in this place. He couldn’t afford to lose his lunch. Then the song changed in pitch, lower, angry. He listened, focusing completely on it, willing his body to obey. Now was not the time to be ill. He wanted to find the singer. No, he needed to find her, though why he wasn’t sure.

He quickly took stock. His pack was gone, lost in the river no doubt. With it were the torches and the healing salve for his burns. His belt pouch, though soaked, was still firmly secured on his wide belt. He unfastened it and opened it, swearing.

He put his hand over the top and flipped it upside down, letting the water pour out. Everything in there, the herb packets, the small parchment for writing notes, all ruined. He let them drop to the sandy ground, keeping ahold of the small light orb his brother, Auron, had given him. He hoped it still worked. The glowing ropes didn’t provide enough light to see. He wiped it on his tunic, and tapped it as he’d been taught. It flared to life, sending rays of light dancing over the cave walls. He finally got a good glimpse of where he was and his stomach did another dangerous flop.

He stood on a narrow sandy beach beside the river that coiled away, disappearing into the darkness. How far from the bridge and ledge was he? He shuddered, afraid to know. He looked upriver, trying to get an idea for where he was. There wasn’t a riverbank except the strip of beach he was on. The river had carved a tunnel through the rock, sheer cliffs on either side made going back the way he came impossible. He wasn’t about the try to risk walking in the river itself. Who knew what might be lurking beneath the surface? He edged toward the sloping walls, ducking under the ropey-glowing moss. It glowed brighter the closer he got, reflecting the light of the orb. He frowned, peering at the walls. Deep in his mind he felt a tug, faint, but persistent. He moved closer, lifting the orb, hoping to get a better glimpse. There was a jagged tear in the rock, a passage leading up and away from the river. He leaned against the edge of the entry letting another wave of dizzy pass. He needed to get out, to find the singer. He dared not guess what sort of creepy crawlies were in the passage.

The tug in his mind was insistent. He needed to go into the passage. He nodded. So far it hadn’t led him wrong. It guided him to where the Slayer had hidden Mayhren, it had guided them back to the surface before the fireball. He swallowed, aware of the tightness in his left cheek, the pain that he was getting used to. He glanced back towards the river and took a deep breath, wincing at the pain in his sides, and stepped into the looming darkness.

It pressed against the orb light, closing around him, blocking off all view and any hope of escape. It felt alive in some way, a malevolent presence that wasn’t willing to let him leave. He forced one foot in front of the other, trying to think of anything other than the dark. His companions, his brother, they probably thought he’d died in the fall. He’d find a way back to the surface and back to Avaria. He’d get beyond the reach of this darkness and find a way to let them know he wasn’t dead.

The passage wound its way upward, in some spots he had to tuck the orb in his tunic and climb steep slopes. With each step the tug got stronger, a pressure in his head that was almost painful.

The passage ended at a stone carved doorway though the door itself had long since rotted away. Zindith stared, disbelief and awe blocking out the pain. How long had it stood silent in the dark, waiting for its masters to return? The tug pulsed, pain shot through his head. He gasped for breath, and edged closer to the doorway. He stepped through the doorway, wishing he had a weapon. Who knew what might be in this place? Stepping away from the door, the light of the orb illuminated an ages old walkway carved into the sides of immense cliffs. Guardrails once stood along the far edge, but most of those had long worn away. All that were left were posts that would have held the railings. Overhead he could see the orb’s light glinting off of what might have been metal chandeliers or some sort of lighting devices.

“Impossible.” He murmured, his voice bouncing off the walls. In the distance, to his left, a stone bridge spanned the chasm, the far end concealed in the blanket of darkness. The tug pulled him in that direction. Bemused and in awe he went where it led, noting the archways that dotted the sides of the chasm, and the passageway. Who had carved these ways? He couldn’t wrap his mind around it. The rahaun hadn’t lived underground. He didn’t recall any other legends that hinted that these passages existed. His heart pounded and the tug became a pounding at his temples. It stopped, as suddenly as it started, when he reached the bridge.

He stared up at the steps leading across the chasm, his heart loud in his ears. The steps led to a wide flat platform, then a walkway arched back downward to a second platform from which another set of stairs led, he hoped, to the other side. He couldn’t tell. The orb’s light cut off, unable to penetrate the wall of dark ahead of him.

He took another look around. The archways, with their passages gaping at him, gave him the shakes. He could almost imagine things just on the other side of the dark, watching him, waiting to strike when the orb flickered out. He shook it off, looked back at the stone bridge. He felt it, briefly. The tug, gently pulling him towards the bridge. He stepped onto the stone bridge, testing it. Who knew how long this had stood, alone, in the dark underground of the Shadowlands. It felt firm.

He  went up the steps, wishing there was a rail of some sort. When he reached the first platform he got a glimpse of the other side and smiled. Another passage, but it veered upward towards steps coiling towards the distant ceiling. His ticket out, perhaps? He hesitated, glancing back the way he’d come, listening. His own breathing was loud in the hush. No echos, no drips, no bodiless voices lamenting in a dead language. Silent. The caverns were holding their breath, the darkness waiting for a misstep. He shook himself. Too many knocks to the head.

Zindith wiped his hand on his breeches. He felt clammy, ill, and dizzy. He hurried across the wide arch toward the second platform. He felt the tremble through his boots, and swore. A cracking sound echoed off the walls of the chasm. He swore darting towards the platform as he felt the bridge beneath his feet crumbling. He jumped, landing on his stomach on the platform the air knocked from his lungs as the arch crumbled, clattering far below. He barely caught his breath, starting to pull himself up when the platform shuddered. He swore, the crack of shattering rock deafening. The platform dropped out from beneath him and he was falling again. He closed his eyes, there was no river below to save him. The fall halted and pain exploded across his jaw and nose as he hit the stone face first. Darkness wrapped around him.

 ~*~

 

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter

Old story revisited

Zander

Originally published at Necia Phoenix. You can comment here or there.

For some reason I started thinking about this old Avaria story which disappeared on a lost hard drive years ago. I decided to try to re-write the intro (I don’t remember how much of it I had actually written) and I have to say, rough as it is, I like this version. Have some slightly raw words;

(quick note, this story will actually pick up right where the prior story, The Darkening Marsh, left off.)

~*~

Time was suspended. Somewhere in the distance something dripped. A slow and steady sound, something to listen to besides ones own heartbeat. Zindith drifted in and out of consciousness, on waves of pain reminding him he was still alive. His heartbeat pounded in his ears, his breathing harsh. Whispers echoed in the dark caverns, memories of voices long since silenced. He heard a groan, realized belatedly that it was his own. He opened his eyes, fighting to stay awake. Darkness closed in around him, and he noticed a faint glow nearby. He frowned and turned to look closer at the glow. Pain shot through his body, a throbbing burning settled along the left side of his face and torso.

Memories rushed at him, who he was and how he’d gotten there, he groaned again. Trapped between enemies, he’d acted, tackling the Slayer, knocking them both over the edge of the ravine. How far had he fallen? The Slayer vanished, opening a rift and sliding into another realm leaving him plummeting towards the river below.

Zindith remembered hitting the cold water, the shock of it sent waves of pain through him. Then nothing. He rolled over, gasping for breath and fighting a churning stomach. Sand, he was on sand. He pushed himself up, peering around. He didn’t remember anything beyond hitting the water. He was far underground, deep in the Labyrinth, but where? How long had he been in the river? He didn’t know. He glanced back at the glowing. Thin ropes of pale green glowing things hung from above. The light they provided was faint, almost useless.

He ran a hand through his hair, inhaling deeply. Musty, moldy, with the faint metallic scent that permeated everything in the Shadowlands. He coughed and groaned. His sides hurt, bruised ribs? Cracked? He hoped nothing was broken. There were no healers in this place.

“Thank the gods for being half telaxian.” He murmured. His voice was loud in the cave, echoing and joining the faint whispers in the distance.

He closed his eyes fighting a wave of dizzy, and heard the singing. A woman’s voice, echoing through the tunnels, singing a song in a language he’d never heard. The tone was haunting, full of loss and deep longing. It tugged at him. He pushed himself to his feet, swaying a bit. He was tough. Like his brothers and sister. Like his father. A little fall wasn’t going to stop him. He gritted his teeth, his stomach doing dangerous flops. What little he’d eaten before needed to stay where it was. He had no rations, no idea of what was edible in this place. He couldn’t afford to lose his lunch. Then the song changed in pitch, lower, angry. He listened, focusing completely on it, willing his body to obey. Now was not the time to be ill. He wanted to find the singer. No, he needed to find her, though why he wasn’t sure.

He quickly took stock. His pack was gone, lost in the river no doubt. With it were the torches and the healing salve for his burns. His belt pouch, though soaked, was still firmly secured on his wide belt. He unfastened it and opened it, swearing.

He put his hand over the top and flipped it upside down, letting the water pour out. Everything in there, the herb packets, the small parchment for writing notes, all ruined. He let them drop the the sandy ground, keeping ahold of the small light orb his brother, Auron, had given him. He hoped it still worked. The glowing ropes didn’t provide enough light to see. He wiped it on his tunic, and tapped it as he’d been taught. It flared to life, sending rays of light dancing over the cave walls. He finally got a good glimpse of where he was and his stomach did another dangerous flop.

He stood on a narrow sandy beach beside the river that coiled away, disappearing into the darkness. How far from the bridge and ledge was he? He shuddered, afraid to know. He looked upriver, trying to get an idea for where he was. There wasn’t a riverbank except the strip of beach he was on. The river had carved a tunnel through the rock, sheer cliffs on either side made going back the way he came impossible. He wasn’t about the try to risk walking in the river itself. Who knew what might be lurking beneath the surface? He edged toward the sloping walls, ducking under the ropey-glowing moss. It glowed brighter the closer he got, reflecting the light of the orb. He frowned, peering at the walls. Deep in his mind he felt a tug, faint, but persistent. He moved closer, lifting the orb, hoping to get a better glimpse. There was a jagged tear in the rock, a passage leading up and away from the river. He leaned against the edge of the entry letting another wave of dizzy pass. He needed to get out, to find the singer. He dared not guess what sort of creepy crawlies were in the passage.

The tug in his mind was insistent. He needed to go into the passage. He nodded. So far it hadn’t led him wrong. It guided him to where the Slayer had hidden Mayhren, it had guided them back to the surface before the fireball. He swallowed, aware of the tightness in his left cheek, the pain that he was getting used to. He glanced back towards the river and took a deep breath, wincing at the pain in his sides, and stepped into the looming darkness.

It pressed against the orb light, closing around him, blocking off all view and any hope of escape. It felt alive in some way, a malevolent presence that wasn’t willing to let him leave. He forced one foot in front of the other, trying to think of anything other than the dark. His companions, his brother, they probably thought he’d died in the fall. He’d find a way back to the surface and back to Avaria. He’d get beyond the reach of this darkness and find a way to let them know he wasn’t dead.

The passage wound its way upward, in some spots he had to tuck the orb in his tunic and climb steep slopes. With each step the tug got stronger, a pressure in his head that was almost painful.

The passage ended at a stone carved doorway though the door itself had long since rotted away. Zindith stared, disbelief and awe blocking out the pain. How long had it stood silent in the dark, waiting for its masters to return? The tug pulsed, pain shot through his head. He gasped for breath, and edged closer to the doorway. He stepped through the doorway, wishing he had a weapon. Who knew what might be in this place? Stepping away from the door, the light of the orb illuminated an ages old walkway carved into the sides of immense cliffs. Guardrails once stood along the far edge, but most of those had long worn away. All that were left were posts that would have held the railings. Overhead he could see the orb’s light glinting off of what might have been metal chandeliers or some sort of lighting devices.

“Impossible.” He murmured, his voice bouncing off the walls. In the distance, to his left, a stone bridge spanned the chasm, the far end concealed in the blanket of darkness. The tug pulled him in that direction. Bemused and in awe he went where it led, noting the archways that dotted the sides of the chasm, and the passageway. Who had carved these ways? He couldn’t wrap his mind around it. The rahaun hadn’t lived underground. He didn’t recall any other legends that hinted that these passages existed. His heart pounded and the tug became a pounding at his temples. It stopped, as suddenly as it started, when he reached the bridge.

He stared up at the steps leading across the chasm, his heart loud in his ears. The steps led to a wide flat platform, then a walkway arched back downward to a second platform from which another set of stairs led, he hoped, to the other side. He couldn’t tell. The orb’s light cut off, unable to penetrate the wall of dark ahead of him.

He took another look around. The archways, with their passages gaping at him, gave him the shakes. He could almost imagine things just on the other side of the dark, watching him, waiting to strike when the orb flickered out. He shook it off, looked back at the stone bridge. He felt it, briefly. The tug, gently pulling him towards the bridge. He stepped onto the stone bridge, testing it. Who knew how long this had stood, alone, in the dark underground of the Shadowlands. It felt firm.

He  went up the steps, wishing there was a rail of some sort. When he reached the first platform he got a glimpse of the other side and smiled. Another passage, but it veered upward towards steps coiling towards the distant ceiling. His ticket out, perhaps? He hesitated, glancing back the way he’d come, listening. His own breathing was loud in the hush. No echos, no drips, no bodiless voices lamenting in a dead language. Silent. The caverns were holding their breath, the darkness waiting for a misstep. He shook himself. Too many knocks to the head.

Zindith wiped his hand on his breeches. He felt clammy, ill, and dizzy. He hurried across the wide arch toward the second platform. He felt the tremble through his boots, and swore. A cracking sound echoed off the walls of the chasm. He swore darting towards the platform as he felt the bridge beneath his feet crumbling. He jumped, landing on his stomach on the platform the air knocked from his lungs as the arch crumbled, clattering far below. He barely caught his breath, starting to pull himself up when the platform shuddered. He swore, the crack of shattering rock deafening. The platform dropped out from beneath him and he was falling again. He closed his eyes, there was no river below to save him. The fall halted and pain exploded across his jaw and nose as he hit the stone face first. Darkness wrapped around him.

 ~*~

 

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Re-Release

Zander

Originally published at Necia Phoenix. You can comment here or there.

One of the greatest things about self pubbing, is if you need to change something, you can. If you don’t like the cover, you’re not stuck with the pubbing co going SOL.

The Magic Maker is one of my favorite stories, and the first of what I hope, many set in that world. To date I haven’t been able to really dabble much with it but I plan to. I redid the cover, and did a skim through to correct things (typos, misspellings, random commas etc) and have gotten it back up.

The Magic Maker

In a corrupt city, Tia struggles to keep her small family together. She finds herself caught between a sorceress and local crime lord, and to top it off, an unknown voice begins begging her for help. With time running out, can she escape the city with family and sanity intact?

Amazon
Barnes & Noble
Smashwords
Kobo

In other news, I’ve had to push Zander back 1 month due to personal reasons. Mid may is the new target.

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Things make up things

Zander

Originally published at Necia Phoenix. You can comment here or there.

I don’t usually participate in twitter chats much, usually because I find myself chasing short people into bed around the same time that the chats are taking place. Somehow, tonight, I managed to slip into the #indiechat with the topic on Hugh Howey’s Author Earnings report thingy that has, apparently, whipped up a frenzy of deniers and what not.

Now, while I did read the report itself and heard writer pals talking about the panicky, accusatory anti self pubbers who attacked it, I really don’t pay much attention dramaz going on. I’ve got my own rl dramaz I’m dealing with, and following the naysayers and the yeahsayers and everyone in between isn’t going to pay the rent or water bill. Anyway, I sat in on the convo, figured I’d learn a thing or three. Hugh showed up and the whole chat trended. It wasn’t as in depth as I would have liked. But it was fascinating to see the perceptions and views expressed.

It was fun, stimulating, and thought provoking. I went back and reread the report (over here if you want to look at it) and then, since I missed the dramaz, went over to PG to see what he was sharing. And it’s…

You know what? go see for yourself;

The Passive Voice just start reading and going back. You’ll find some interesting views, some I agreed with, some I don’t. It’s educational, and (imo) very interesting.

It think, when it’s all said and done, JW Manus summed it up fairly well (emphasis mine):

……It’s really not about the money…. Money is very nice and pays the bills. But every real writer I’ve ever met (and by real, I mean the passionate, even hypergraphic wordsmiths and storytellers who love nothing more than bringing mere words to life) will write and tell stories even there is no money in it. Their real goal is not money, but readers. Because without readers a piece of writing is incomplete. It exists, it is tangible, but without readers it is dancing on an empty stage in a closed theater or singing in the shower. Readers complete the connection.

 

Go read the whole post over here, I was nodding and agreeing all the way through.

~*~

SO, I’ve been kinda MIA these days. There are reasons, some have to do with unexpected house guest staying for a time, some are health related, mood related and digi art related. Yes, digi art. My other obsession. I’ll get to that in a moment.

I’ve been caught up in some very not cool things that have had to be dealt with. We’re still trying to get the fires put out, and it might be a few weeks before things start looking back up. In the meantime I’m plugging away at Bastard Prince and trying not to feel guilty for not having as much done as I wanted to. The tentative release date is April 12th, but depending on the current RL issues, I may have to push it back a month.

I started redoing covers, starting with The Magic Maker and have hit a wall. I know what I see in my head, but doing it is another thing. I’m worried (I always worry) that it is too dark. Here are two examples. I have a third I haven’t rendered yet, but I’m not too sure I’m going in the right direction with these.

testcover      testcover1

There was something else I was going to mention but I’ve forgotten. -.-  Remind me, I owe yall a post on digi art, but now, it’s late, I’m behind on words and I need to get to bed. Hope yall are having a great Febuary.

**waves**

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Sunday Serenity

Zander

Originally published at Necia Phoenix. You can comment here or there.

Whew, it’s been a while since I’ve done this, and I apologize for neglecting my blog here. Since it’s cold and snowy in so many places in the US right now, I thought I’d share a bit of a tropical flashback. It’s the best I can do. :P

Have a peaceful sunday!

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Still here

Zander

Originally published at Necia Phoenix. You can comment here or there.

I have been sick, still trying to get writing stuff handled. Zbk1 edits are in full swing, shooting for an April 12 release (my birthday). I have some awesome betas who are giving me great input. Have a mini snippage:

 

Valen handed Zander a small sphere with odd indents and markings on it. Zander frowned and looked up at his friend.

“What is this?” He whispered.

“A charge.” Valen grinned, lifting up another one. “Push down here,” he tapped a raised, circular impression in the middle of it. “Till it clicks, then toss it at enemy, and it goes boom. Big explosions. Sometimes messy, always loud.”

“Fun.”

“You have no idea.”

 

Hope yall are doing okay. **waves**

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Another rough snip

Zander

Originally published at Necia Phoenix. You can comment here or there.

Okay then

Rough, it needs scrubbing. I KNOW this….  Mikial’s nickname is Shaderunner fyi 

~*~

The odd hut was divided into three small rooms with a large central fire-pit area. Mikial built up the fire as the women divided making it comfortable. He tried not to notice how closely they watched him, his injuries were still healing and he could feel their concern. On some level it was touching. On another, he couldn’t bring himself to care. He wanted to be healed, he wanted to be done. He wanted to go back to the caves, to confront Avari and demand an explanation.

He was going to get one. He’d given his existence to her. She’d better damn well give him one. Or else,

He hesitated, crouched in front of the fire, watching the flickering flames. Or else what? She was a goddess, what could he do, after all?

He stood, stretching sore muscles, testing the healing tissue. Years of life, of living, slowed his body’s healing. Velvet, despite her assistance, couldn’t counter that. And there was the damn monitor. It wouldn’t allow his body to heal faster than the algorithms programed years ago. He absently rubbed at it as he left the dome.

The fields of Tives stretched out before him and in the distance the broken and tumbled city walls of Tives itself stood, silent testament to the anger of the gods. He tightened the cloak around his shoulders, staring towards the rubble.

Gods, Goddesses. His life was caught up in a massive joke. What was the point? Time rolled past him, for a brief moment he could almost see the faces of his past lovers, lost friends. Dria would have raged, Savna counseled, Rinoa exploded, he shuddered. Too many. And now, with the bond he couldn’t rightfully seek solace of death. Velvet’s life lay on his shoulders.

He sensed her, before he heard her, old friend, one of the few who knew Dria, who fought in the goblin wars and managed the catacomb collapses. Emmalin stopped a little bit behind him, not saying anything though he felt her mind brush his, ever so gently, gauging, testing. Almost too light for even him to detect.

“You know, Vel feels awful about the whole binding issue.” She said softly.

Mikial couldn’t respond. How could he? What was there to say?

“It saved her life, repeatedly though.”

He half turned frowning at her. “How?”

“She’s never explained. But I’ll say this, if she’d died, when attacked, if she’d died way back when being tortured, she wouldn’t have been able to save Zin, or pull the unbound together.” Emm was staring at him, her overlarge dark eyes very serious. Mikial felt his stomach twist as she stepped closer, resting a hand on his shoulder.

“Avari betrayed you to your enemy, I see that, you’re in shock, I know. But when I see you I remember the man who faced down the dragons, who stood firm against the spider queen.” She glanced over her shoulder towards the dome, then back at him. “We’ve seen some crazy shit in our day, Mikial. She has no idea. And the man you were back then, got buried under bureaucracy.” She touched his face. “I miss that man.”

“Perhaps that man is dead.” He said softly.

Emm smiled sadly and shook her head. “No, I don’t think so.” She leaned forward hesitated and brushed a kiss against his lips. “There’s game a few miles south of here. You and Vel, you have some things you have to work out. I’ll get out of your hair,”

“Emm,”

“So you can get that straightened out and,”

“Emm, she needs you here.” He wasn’t sure it was a good idea to be left alone with the little red-head, but Emm shook her head with a sad smile.

“No, because she’ll hide behind me, because you scare the ever-loving piss out of her.” She patted his arm, then squeezed gently. “She’s tough, yes, she’s had to be. But she’s as alone as you are, and the bond was the only thing that kept her sane.”

He nodded. Emm took a deep breath and grinned. “Have fun.” And was gone.

He swore under his breath. Typical. There were times, like then, that she reminded him so much of Dria it made him want to weep. It was why he’d cut off contact. He couldn’t handle the pain that welled up every time he thought of the lost free-spirit.

 

###

 

I will clean this up, I promise.

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Snippet out of the blue

Zander

Originally published at Necia Phoenix. You can comment here or there.

This is from….a project I really shouldn’t be working on.

~*~

 

The voices of the patrons of the One Winged Angel created a mildly comforting din as they cheered the pit fighters on. Velvet leaned against the bar watching, amused, as her customers yelled, laughed and cheered. She couldn’t see the fighters, but could tell by the cheers, who was dueling. A slim brunette, curls bouncing around her shoulders, wove her way through the crowd, a tray of empty dishes held overhead. She nodded at Velvet and glanced over her shoulder.

“They’re actually fighting rather well tonight.” She said as she slid the tray on the counter and turned around. “The bets are getting ridiculous!”

“Who’s winning?” Velvet leaned closer. She brushed a kiss against the brunette’s shoulder. Emm glanced at her with a grin.

“I couldn’t tell, they’re both fairly bloody.”

“Great, we’ll have patching up to do.” Vel chuckled.

“You’ll have patching up to do.” Emm laughed, moving around to the back of the counter. “I just work here.”

The door to the tavern opened, and Vel got a glimpse of swirling snow outside before the view was blocked by a tall figure. Her smile faded and she pushed herself upright watching the tall man and his two companions step into the taproom.

“Shut the gods be damned door, fool, unless you want to pay to heat this place!” Emm yelled.

The man looked her way and smirked. The door shut behind him, cutting off the howling wind. His companions looked at him in surprise. He’d not touched the door with his hand. He strode forward, aware that most eyes were on him. Pale hair, albino skin, and brilliant green eyes that laughed at her. Velvet shook her head. Trouble. Pure trouble.

“Kale, I’d be careful were I you, I’ve seen your tab here.” Emm pointed the cudgel she kept under the counter. “I’ll make you go wash my dishes!”

“You don’t want me to do that.” Kale said with a laugh, leaning against the counter. “Just ask the staff at the caves, I break more than I clean.”

“On purpose, I’d wager.” Vel snorted and glanced at the two silently following Kale and back at him with a frown.

“They were set to follow me.” He turned, gripped the shoulder of the nearest man, hauling him to the counter. “But I caught them, so I invited them along for a drink.” He smiled.

“Poor fools.” Emm said. She leaned towards the man at the counter. “You might just want to give up the commission, my friend. Really not worth it.”

“I figure they’ll be kind enough to pay my tab, after trying to chase me through this gods-forsaken city.” Kale looked down at the men and held out his hand. “Your purses, please, if you’ll be so kind.”

The men looked at each other and slowly reached for their belts.

“Nothing funny gentlemen,” Vel said softly. “Neither of you will walk out alive.”

They gulped and nodded, handing over some very heavy looking money pouches. Kale bounced them in his hand and nodded, glancing at them. “Go away.”

The men vanished.

“Where did you port them?” Emm asked, eyes wide.

“Creshna, near the Sable mountains.” Kale grinned.

“Evil.” Vel snickered. “What are you doing here, Kale? I thought the Goddess Avari frowned down on her pets consorting with us uncouth unbounds.”

“She does. Except when she’s given orders to hunt you out.” He rested elbows on the counter. “And I have specific instructions to ask you to kindly come for a visit to the caves.”

“What does she want?” Vel asked, heart pounding in her ears.

“Father has been asked to host a meeting of immortals, namely unbound, to discuss the current Slayer situation.” Kale leaned towards Vel. “Rumor has it you’d be the best one to ask about the Slayer.”

“Ooo an invitation from the Shaderunner.” Emm said leaning against Vel’s shoulder. “Sounds exciting.”

“A meeting?” Vel looked at her. “Sounding exciting?”

“The Staff of the Caves make the absolute best pastries and I know several back passages to get them.” Emm grinned impishly at her, then turned towards Kale. “When does his grumpyness want us there?”

“Us?” Vel eyed Emm.

“Grumpyness?” Kale snickered. “In two days. I’ll port you…”

“Kale, I’ve been porting since before your mother’s people were a clan. I think I can handle it.” Emm said. “Just tell us when we need to be there.”

Kale snorted. “One of these days Emm, I’m going to get you to tell me a tale or two. Loren say’s you’ve got a lot of them.”

She laughed. “Not today, Kale.”

Vel stewed, leaning against the counter. “Great. Just what I need to deal with.”

“Aww come on red, it’ll be fun.” Emm said. She kissed Vel’s cheek. “You’ve never seen funny until you’ve seen a startled centaur on marble.”

Kale snorted.

“I’d rather not have to deal with Shaderunner.” Vel said, voice low. The idea made her blood run cold. There were some beings in the world far too powerful for their own good.

“Why? Father’s not that bad, Vel, not really.” Kale looked confused.

“God-like powers, not that bad?” Vel snorted.

“Just hand him some ancient tome or book and he’ll be happy.” Kale winked. “Besides, I heard he likes redheads, kind of a weakness thing!” He vanished, leaving a money bag on the counter.

Vel stared at the bag and glanced at Emm. “I really didn’t want to hear that.”

 

###

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Inside The Author’s Mind released

Zander

Originally published at Necia Phoenix. You can comment here or there.

The series is done, for now, and compiled into a complete collection.

cover

 

Inside The Author’s Mind is a collection of shorts written from the
point of view of the story elements. From characters, to ideas, to
muses, and editor, these have previously been sold singly and are
now put together. The collection is approximately 6400 words, 25
pages, and includes The Shiny, Redshirts, Muse Interrupted, Editor In Chains, 
Daydream Paradise Beach

It is available at:

Smashwords
Amazon.com
Barnes & Noble
Kobo

Now on to the next project!

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2014 Goals, Plans, and Expectations

Zander

Originally published at Necia Phoenix. You can comment here or there.

A new year, new goals. I’ve made up a tentative publishing schedule for this new year, starting with the goal of one new publication (large or small) a month with three large releases for the year. We’ll see how it goes. Goals are dreams with a date on them they say. And I’ve even taken into account the usual grueling summers I have.

There are plans to move to another house sometime in late spring early summer which may disrupt things.

The big releases, the first three Zander books, are slated for April, ?June?, and September/October. The final book, Crossroads (which *might* be 2 books) *might* be ready by December.

I’m still dabbling with the idea of E1 up as a serial, but I’m not sure with everything else I have on my plate, that I have the mental capacity to to that atm. I might do something like that over the summer since E1 is, for the most part done.

Other smaller projects will be released through the rest of the year, hopefully on a monthly basis. I’m not hinging all my hopes on any one project. As a writer who plans to be around for a long time, my larger goals are long term, not hinged on any one book. A career isn’t built on one book, rather multiple projects. I’ll refer you to Dean Wesley Smith for more on that particular viewpoint.

I also have the goal of doing a Friday Flash fiction every week this year. Lofty? Maybe. I’m gonna try to do it though.

Last year’s sales;

With the lack of new material up for sale, sales were fairly non-existent. I haven’t pulled up the actual numbers yet, but I know they were spotty. There are a number of reasons why, ranging from pricing, covers that need to be improved and just lack of new material to keep my name up at the top of the new release lists and whatnot. Last year was fairly brutal for me. For a number of reasons and that impacted me finishing and releasing stuff. In short; sales sucked and I’m the reason why.

That was last year. This is a new year, new opportunities, new information to learn. This year. I want to write more. I need to write more. I need to get a better handle on covers, formatting and get back in the game so to speak. The paralyzing that halted me over the past year and a half, seems to have melted away. While there is a touch of anxiety, it isn’t halting me. Onward and upward! I’m ready! Are you?

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2013 Winding Down

Zander

Originally published at Necia Phoenix. You can comment here or there.

2013 is almost over, and I have to say, writing-wise, I didn’t do as much as I’d planned. But what’s done is done and I’m not going to beat myself over the head about it. I’m still writing, and that’s a lot more than a lot of ‘writers’ these days. I’m putting together a 2014 business plan atm, will post it as soon as it’s more than a vague idea.

Dean Wesley Smith has a 2013 wrapup over here which I thought was very interesting.

I hope you all have a great Christmas (If you celebrate it), Yule, Winter Solstice, etc.

 

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December is here

Zander

Originally published at Necia Phoenix. You can comment here or there.

Where did the year go? Rhetorical question, I’m not expecting an answer :P . So I did hit the nano words and my brain decided that Dmitri was going to go to sleep and Zander promptly started whispering at me. 0.o

Something that I noticed, post nano. I don’t seem to have the post nano brain-dead. I think it’s because writing has become such an integral part of my day (yes my DAY) that writing 50k really isn’t all that big a deal. Looking over my records on writing, I seem to have the greatest monthly output, wordwise, in feb, march and april. Interesting (imo).

I was fiddling with a program called Aeon Timeline to set up the timeline for the Zander stories. Mind you I’ve tried a number or programs and most timeline ones limit the dates. This thing is effing awesome. The world Zander lives on and the time frames in this world are VAST. This program allows me to set up my own date/calendar system. My OCD is very happy with this. VERY happy.

I managed to do the timeline for Books 1-3 and then Zander/Talia’s part of bk 4 and was starting to work on the timeline for the forensic fantasy part of bk 4 when I realized that I needed the name of a character, I couldn’t for the LIFE of me remember his name. So I did something I shouldn’t have done. I opened up my backup files and started skimming through old versions of Crossroads. -.- I am kindof surprused how well it holds up. YES there are issues, and no I don’t think I’d be able to edit it to fit into the new plot/timeline. But some of those scenes are golden. Just golden.

Anyways, I’m back to plugging away on the Zander story, I want to finish bk 2 before Jan 1st. Anyways this sat on my computer for way too long. Hope yall are having a good december so far.

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Sunday Serenity

Zander

Originally published at Necia Phoenix. You can comment here or there.

2013-11-01 08.25.04Took this about a week ago. So Pretty.

Have a peaceful day, relax, unwind, enjoy a moment of recharging.

 

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NaNo day 3

Zander

Originally published at Necia Phoenix. You can comment here or there.

Day 1 –  1022
Day 2 – 5505
Day 3 – 2112 – I am not finished with this scene so this will go up

Snip:

The Weather Man held up a hand, and went to one of the walls. He touched it and what looked like a drawer slid open, he dipped his hand into the drawer and when he lifted it out, he held a  blue stone set in gold hanging from a thin gold chain.  He handed it to Miranda. “That belonged to the mate of Sharuth, one of their last great leaders.”

“I can’t take this.” She stared at the stone. The Weather Man tipped her head up, meeting her eyes.

“Keep it, don’t wear it openly, consider it a good luck charm if you will. A hand-fasting gift from an old bavnan sorcerer. These people need something to hope for. Perhaps you can bring the life back into this old keep.”

“Weather Man,” Miranda tried to hand it back and he shook his head, closing her fingers around the amulet.

“I meant it. Keep it. She gave it to me, before Sharuth was killed and she took their remaining offspring into exile. And I’m giving it to you.”

<<<<>>>>>

Happy nanoing!

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Flash Fiction Friday # 12

Zander

Originally published at Necia Phoenix. You can comment here or there.

This is sort of a two parter. Part one can be found over here.

WARNING FOR POSSIBLE TRIGGERY STUFF
(just to be on the safe side)

How it Began; Part 2

(c) 2013 Necia Phoenix

The cave stank of fear and desperation. Greyson stopped just inside the entry to gain control of his stomach, and let his night vision adjust. Seeing in the dim light, while a blessing in the mountains, was a curse in the dank tunnel. There were things he didn’t want to see. Remains of other victims lay by the doors of their cells. They were far too late to save them. Dmitri, hadn’t been willing to come inside, now that he was there, Grey couldn’t blame him.

“Come on, boy, she’d be down this way.” Stilgar’s voice broke through his thoughts. Grey nodded.

“He said four or five cells.” Habcore said. “There’s a lot more here than four or five.”

“Aye.” Toura looked ill.

“Lothos is crazy.” Grey said. A whimper drifted from the depths of the tunnel.

“Someone is down there.” Stilgar said softly.

“Dragonmaster, she might know him,” Fiore said, stepping over. “But I’m female, and it was a male that did this to her.”

Stilgar looked back and forth between them and nodded. “Go with her Grey, she may recognize your voice.”

Fiore took the furs from him, and he followed her down the cold tunnel.

She was huddled in a corner, her pale skin covered in dark bruises, her only covering was her pale hair around her. She looked towards them fearfully, cringing.

“Open this door Grey.” Fiore whispered.  She turned her attention to the woman, her voice soft. “My lady? We’re here to get you out, Lady Aunusha sent us.”

Grey nodded, gripping the bars, pulling on the dragon-strength and anger. No one had ever looked at him in such fear. He stepped back, tearing the door from the frame set in the stone, and resisted the urge to throw it, setting it to one side. Fiore crouched beside the woman, draping the fur over her slim form. The woman kept looking towards Grey with a frown.

“Do you remember Greyson?” Fiore asked. The woman’s lower lip trembled.

She looked at Fiore. “The Dragonmaster’s son.”

“Yes. And the Dragonmaster is playing lookout. We’ll take you where it’s safe.” Fiore pushed a strand of hair from the woman’s face.

“He’ll find me.” She whispered. “He said he’ll find me if I try to leave.”

“No, we won’t let that happen.” Grey said, trying to keep his voice calm.

“You can’t stop him.”

“We got here, didn’t we?” Greyson asked. He met her eyes. “Trust us. We won’t let him find you.”

She stilled, her eyes flickering from a pale blue-green, to the blank Spirit state. She nodded, looked up at Fiore and tried to stand, her body swaying. “Take me home.”

 

She whimpered once when Grey shifted, and Fiore secured her to the carry rig. It hung between his front legs, and would shelter her during the flight. He crouched, preparing to launch when Habcor roared a warning. Two large ice dragons approaching, fast.

Grey lurched into the air, trying to get used to the extra weight. Out of the corner of his eye, he saw a blur of pale grey, diving from the clouds, slamming into one of the approaching dragons, pushing it into the other, with air-piercing roar. Then he was past them, following Stilgar and Fiore’s dark shapes through the clouds.

 

“Physically she’ll recover.” Lady Aunusha  said, stepping from the inner room where servants had taken the injured woman. “It’ll take time to see how and if her mind recovers.”

Grey, Fiore and Stilgar had stayed at the Oracle of the Spirit Elementals, the others returned to the Hollow. They watched the Lady as she paced, her hands clasped in front of her.

“What will the Grande Council do about Lothos? This is not the first time this has happened.” She looked at them. “Will there be any justice for them?”

Stilgar frowned. “Before we left, I requested an immediate Council, to discuss this and prior incidents. However, there is a chance Lothos could counter it, I did break multiple treaties…”

“You saved her life.” She whispered. “Are treaties more important?”

“In the eyes of some of the Council, yes. I took a risk that could cause war if Lothos feels so inclined. I felt it was worth taking, others won’t agree.”

“You are the Dragonmaster,” she glared. “You could order him,”

“To what? My authority extends only to my clan. The Ice Dragons have their own rules. We’ll do what we can. But even with the might of the Council behind us, I doubt anything can be done about him. One of his underlings, yes. Lothos is their leader, and that would mean removing him,”

“Which should be done!”

“You and I both agree with that! I don’t think the council will see it that way. The Ice Dragons are a bit unpredictable to begin with, remove their leader and we’d have a serious problem to our North, one the council won’t want to deal with.”

“I see. My thanks, again, Dragonmaster, for your help in this matter.” She turned and went back into the inner room without another word.

Fiore sighed. “One ally lost.”

“Two. I doubt Dmitri made it out unscathed.” Stilgar corrected her, glancing at Grey. “Well?”

“Is this what you do all day?”

“And jump off ledges. It scares the piss out of peasants.” Stilgar flashed a tired smile. “We’ve done all we can here, now to go let Megare know where we were.”

“You didn’t tell mother where we were going?” Grey stared at his father incredulous.

“Oh gods.” Fiore, pushed ahead of them. “This is going to be a loud one.”

“I may have left out a few details.” Stilgar said dryly.

“Mother would have wanted to come along.” Grey said.

“I’d rather spare her the nightmares.” Stilgar said. “I don’t think any of us are going to rest well knowing about that cave.”

“Or the ones we were too late for.”

Stilgar nodded, patting his shoulder. “Come on; let’s go face the angry dragoness.”

<<<<>>>>>

Word count came in at 998.

Other Flash Fics can be found over here

As this IS a Dragon/Elemental world snip I’ll go ahead and link over here to the other Dragon snips on the site, in chronological order.

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Wednesday

Zander

Originally published at Necia Phoenix. You can comment here or there.

It never looks right when I write it out.*

I’ve been plugging away on all sorts of things, bouncing around with RL stuff and writing projects that I keep forgetting to get over here to get a post up. SO, projects;

Zander book one, roughly done. There are a few things I need to go back and fill in which will bump the word count up.

Inside the Author’s Mind – I’ve been dabbling at that, I’ve gotten the one story halfway done and realized I think that’s it. I do need to pull together a cover for it now.

Zander book 2 – I thought I had about 17k on it. I poked at it, I prodded, then I realized that no, it wasn’t going to work. Book two has been started again from scratch. But I think it works better than the 17 k.

I’m going to go ahead and use it for NaNo and see how it goes. Hopefully it won’t negate Book 3 too terribly much and I won’t have to rewrite IT. >.>

OTHER stuff:

Flash Fiction; I want to get back in the habit of tossing those up on fridays. But I’m not sure I’ll be able to before the first of the year.

Elemental Series: E1 sits in limbo. I haven’t done much more than reread it in months. I know it has issues. E2 screeched to a halt, the others are also hanging in limbo as stories at the far end of the series hijack my brain. My dragons are overpowering.

I have been researching crowdfunding projects, and polls and have been putting together a tentative plan for next year. More on that if anything pulls together solidly. My brain has been very flaky lately. I was thinking of putting together some sort of ongoing series on the dragons/elementals but it’s a very vague and unformed idea.

Anywho, need to get words and do some mundane RL stuff. Have a good day.

 

*edited because it was spelled wrong. That’s why it looked wrong. **facepalms** **sigh**

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Epiphany

Zander

Originally published at Necia Phoenix. You can comment here or there.

One of my favorite unfinished novels takes place in the Zander world. Titled Velvet and the Shadow, it’s a love story of sorts. One problem I had was that the story fizzled after about… 30 or 40k. The characters kinda fell together too easily. At the time I couldn’t figure out why and I set it aside. It’s fairly far down in the ‘list’ (22 or 23 or some such number) and I figured by the time I got to it, I’d figure out why I had trouble with it.

With NaNo right around the corner I’ve been going over nano plans and projects and put together a possible rough prologue for Z BK2. That sparked a short scene idea, just a snippet which will probably never be in any book, kindof a historic glimpse of something that shaped the past of Zander’s world. I made myself cry **rollseyes**

But then I realized something about the one character who witnesses this sad event. (I will say this, there are multiple reasons I’m not comfy with snipping that here, mainly the topic is quite depressing, unrequited love & all that) This event shapes his future and how he handles things in the future.

Some of the things that lead to some other things is because of the depression he falls into post this event. The domino effects of this are far reaching, and adds to some of his issues. Yeah, if people think I’m mean to Zander, seriously wait till I start getting into Mikial’s story.

But yeah, THAT realization led me to the epiphany, the why I stalled with Velvet and the Shadow. I know why Vel & Mikial never would have fallen together that easily. They’re both deeply hurting souls, and very walled off from others. It’s going to take a lot more than what I had to bring them to any kind of understanding let along ‘together’.

**rubs hands together**

**scribbles out notes**

I also realized that I don’t think I’ll ever be able to write Savna’s story.

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How the Myths still affect us

Zander

Originally published at Necia Phoenix. You can comment here or there.

This post was inspired in great part by Kristine Rusch’s post Story Demands.

For years I had this dream of publishing the Zander books traditionally. I pictured them on a bookshelf in a bookstore, I would even go to waldenbooks and find where my name was and kinda scoot the books around so there would be room for them. >.>  Ever do that? :P

As brick and morter bookstores vanished (where I lived we only had chain bookstores, tehre were NO small indipendent ones) so too went the dreams of seeing the books in bookstores, and when I decided to self pub, there was a period slight mourning. I’d never ever see them in print. Ever.

Ok so that was dramatic, now I’m planning on putting out print editions eventually but for the n00b self pubber a couple years ago (a couple YEARS??? O.M.G!) it was a drastic thought, I wasn’t sure I’d ever do print copies at all.

But there were a lot of things that hung on. Sure I was going to self pub, but I was clinging to a lot of the traditional thought processes and that included how I was putting a story together and the wordcount caps.

As you can see, if you take a glance at my offerings, I have shorts up. Nothing large. A lot of reasons for this, many of them are legitimate time and RL issues (I have had some life upsets over the past year and a half that have impacted writing and publishing), but there are other reasons, a lot of them have to do with the fear issue. Fear of failure, fear of imperfection, fear of ridicule, fear of something I can’t quite put my finger on.

Larger project = heftier formatting = greater chance of typos = imperfection

And everyone has seen the ridicule self pubbers have garnered from others if they have typos and imperfections in their self edited* projects.

But then again, look at the ‘traditional’ published authors who ALSO get ridiculed. It doesn’t seem to matter who you are, if you put out something in the public eye there is going to be someone, somewhere who is going to hate it and make fun of it. Period.

I can list off numerous people who have ignored this and continued on. From musicians, to actors, writers, directors, and so on.

I can also point out people who have thrown in the towel, hundreds, thousands even, who have given up, gotten bitter, and continued on in their little lives, because somebody didn’t like what they did/said/produced so they stomped off in a hissy fit. Or just went *poof*.

Smaller projects, while still subject to dreaded typos, are less time consuming on formatting and easier to typo check (in theory). They are safer. Again in theory.

**takes a deep breath**

The projects that really move me are my big ones. The monstrocities. The doorstoppers. The ones that I got duped into believing years ago would never sell. The huge epic ones I was told that agents weren’t representing them because publishing companies aren’t going to buy them.

I’m not even going to breach the George R.R. Martin thing, I really am not. :P

So the things I learned as a nOOb writer, trying to break into the business included;

  • don’t make your first book part of a trilogy, pubbers don’t want to risk investing on an unknown whose work might not even sell.
  • Don’t make your first book larger than 90k. agents won’t shop it around because pubbers won’t buy it. Typesetting issues and cost and whatnot.
  • General fantasy and Epic fantasy no longer sell. That ship sailed in the 90s, don’t write it. UF and vampires are the ‘thing’. And romance.
  • Sex. If in doubt, toss sex on the page. The more your characters get laid, the greater chance you have of selling your book or bagging an agent, and the more explicit, the better. (I swear to dog I heard this from multiple sources!)

Now obviously these are wrong. I’m not going to tell you how to ‘bag an agent’ mainly because I don’t feel the need for one. There are other places you can go to locate that information, here is not one of those places.

But this was my understanding, among others which I am still discovering (some of these are so deep rooted I have a hard time defining what they are!) as I go along.

Last night I finished the rough draft of Bastard Prince. In came in at 52k with several placeholders in the beginning for battles and such that I need to plan out a bit better to fill in. There are some threads I need to lay, and flesh out, some plotholes which make it look like a colander (I think I could drive a jet plane through some of them XD) but it is, for lack of a better word, done.

I also pulled up what I have of bks 2 & 3 and got a good idea of what I need to do to finish them. And I saw what the myths of the trad pubbing had done to my story, and how it had tweaked with my head.

I had this story, you see. And it’s a life story. It’s Zander’s story, and it geeks me right the hell out. He’s got an intense one, with highs and lows, with loves and hates, joys and sorrows. Friendships and betrayals and all of it moves through a greater story which pushes the world he lives in to the brink, and eventually, possibly, over. And it’s important.

But to make it fit, to appease who I thought needed to be appeased to get it to the people I wanted to share it with, I came close to murdering it. One of the most important foundational parts of the story, book two (which needs a name) rings in at 16k right now with a lot of [this happens here] type of place holders.  Why? Because I was going to skim over it. I was thinking, oh this is the romance part, the slow-down part. This is the part people are going to yawn through. I can do flashbacks.

You see, even though I decided I was going to self pub it, I was still stuck thinking I was writing one book. I was locked into thinking that I needed to keep it small. I was trying to squeeze all of this huge, epic story into 90k. 17 (or was it 19?) years of world shaking events into 90k.

I sat in on a few conversations with some friends at FM as I mentioned in some posts over here, and my brain kinda rebelled, and melted and threw a full on tantrum (really, brain? REALLY?) but in the end it was like a sign from dog.

I sat down and did the outlines for books 1 – 3 and knew that this was right. This is the story I’m trying to tell. And it’s all important. And 90k just isn’t enough room to tell it all. And that led me to think about Crossroads (which is the grande finale to the Zander story). Which scares me because that is a friggen monster story and brain started doing the flailing again because brain realized that I KNEW, finally, that I didn’t have to stick to the old formulas anymore, and when it stopped its flailing and started calming down, it started thinking about the things I tossed as irrelevant to the story because of that whole 90k/bag-an-agent-go-trad thing. Things that were relevant. Things that need to be there.  I realize now that  Crossroads will be two books (I *might* divide it three ways, I’m not sure yet).

DC – stop laughing. I can hear you. Even now, through the screen I can HEAR you laughing. Stop it NOW. -.-

**clears throat**

The FM crowd, they make fun of me. My plotbunnies breed.

And you know what really bothers me? How much I have let myself be held back by traditional publishing myths. I have a lot of stories to write. I have a lot of stories to tell. Many of them, oh so many of them in Zander’s world. Zander isn’t the only character in his world that I adore. There’s Auron, Michael, Kale, Shaderunner, Rune, Tayek, Nyhavi, Tienovey(though there is a lot of Tien in Zander’s story) Ivonnova (still trying to decide on the spelling there), Caladorn, Eric(name change imminent), Brent, Uralko and so on. But without Zander’s tale, I just can’t tell the others. His is the foundation. Why? Ask brain, I just write ;)

How much further, would I have been if I had realized sooner that I didn’t have to keep it under a certain size?

You know what really makes me wonder? What other things are going to come up that are holding me back in little ways?

I can say this, (hours after I wrote all that up there)  I started reading ZBK1 today (I know I just finished it yesterday) and I found myself loving it. Just loving it. It’s rough, it needs work, and I see where I need to tweak things and I found some typos I need to fix. But I love it.

I love the words I finished working on yesterday. I don’t hate them. Another myth bites the dust.


This is why I took Angela James Before You Hit Send workshop. Seriously, worth every penny I spent on it, and if she puts it out in a book form I’m so buying it. Awesome, awesome workshop.

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Sunday Serenity

Zander

Originally published at Necia Phoenix. You can comment here or there.

Today I’m working on Zander and maybe some formatting. Have some music.

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Newsish stuff

Zander

Originally published at Necia Phoenix. You can comment here or there.

This past week I landed myself in the ER.

It threw my whole schedule off just a wee bit. There have been tests, and phone calls. I don’t know yet what exactly is going on, I’ll be making more phone calls Monday to various financial and dr offices to get answers for multiple questions about how the hell I’m going to pay for continued care (we’re in-between insurance coverage for me, tho the kids and hubs are all covered. I left myself off). I am not on death’s door. I’m just very fatigued.

Today I’m working on wrapping up the Inside the Author’s Mind story collection, writing (there are only a couple more stories to write to wrap it up) and formatting it. Tomorrow I’ll put together a new cover and hopefully sometime next week I’ll have it up for sale.

Have a great weekend folks.

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Music and the writer – Sunday Serenity

Zander

Originally published at Necia Phoenix. You can comment here or there.

I know this isn’t universal, but I find I write best with music playing. But not just anything. I don’t just turn on the radio, or random playlist and let music play. I have playlists. I have theme songs. Certain songs evoke certain moods and make me think of certain stories. My first completed novel was written to four songs played endlessly over and over (and drove my hubby NUTS I tell you!). Well lately, as I’ve been working on Zander I’ve had another character, the ice dragon, talking at me. Yesterday, I discovered music that fits him.

I’ve also had other music, songs that fit other situations and characters.

~*~


Lux Aeterna – from the movie Requiem for a Dream (most people don’t know that this part is only part of the full song which is something like 18 min long, but this part is the epic bit I love). This is Zander’s story. All of it. Laid out in music. Close your eyes, listen, hear the swells and receeds, feel the power building, that’s Zander’s story. and it leaves you almost breathless with it’s intensity. (Or it does me)

~*~


I see this as a clip, a video of sorts of Zander’s kids :P . Glimpsing each of their adventures, I would love to do a digi video set to this music with the end of it a picture of Zander surrounded by the five of them. **sigh** :D

~*~

Grey’s story. Hands down. It’s an achingly beautiful song (IMO) and it’s just…it’s Grey and Nekita.

~*~

This always makes me think of E2 for some reason, which is one of my Nano Projects for this year.

~*~


And finally this, The Promise by Vas. This song, and other songs by Azam Ali (the singer of Vas) were what I was listening to while writing E1. I have no idea what language it is in, I think Turkish? But I’m not sure.

So, as my Sunday Serenity post, what music, if any, helps you write? Inspires you? Have a great Sunday yall!

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Sunday Serenity

Zander

Originally published at Necia Phoenix. You can comment here or there.

Today I will write, relax, finish the short, and try not to stress about rl stuff tomorrow (trying to get wheels so I can take care of rl issues).  Have some sand art.

 

 

 

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